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Read and rate Travel Journal Entries for Arcos de la Frontera, Andalucia, Spain

Sep 26, 2015 - Arcos De la Frontera

We picked up a rental car at the Seville Airport and headed toward the “hill towns.” The roads were not crowded and even in the towns our iPhone GPS got us through the twisty-turning streets. Our hotel is in Arcos De la Frontera on a oneway street with a private gated car park just up a bit from the hotel’s door. These towns pride themselves on the “de la Frontera” designation since they were the outposts of the Christian Reconquista in the 14th - 15th Centuries. The hill towns cling to the sides of the hills and are protected by a fort....

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May 16, 2013 - Arcos de la Fontera

Arcos de la Frontera Slept well. Woke to the ringing of church bells and the crowing of roosters! Typical breakfast...bread, ham, cheese, yogurt, sweet breads/cookies, fresh squeezed orange juice and coffee. Coffee here is served last...yikes...and has not been all that good. We have used lots of our instant Starbucks ! Our morning field trips were to see the famous Andalusian horses at a breeding and training farm and to tour a sherry bodega. These were both nearby in Jerez de la Fontera. Both very interesting. Both very traditional and...

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May 16, 2013 - Arcos de la Frontera

Slept in until 8:00! No alarm. The birds outside woke us up. Leisurely breakfast...one of our best...actually had eggs to order and fresh squeezed orange juice. Short bus ride on a winding road that was not made for buses much less buses meeting on-coming traffic! Beautiful mountainous area with the whitewashed hill town of Grazalema as our destination. We would catch glimpses of it as we wound our way around the corners. Went on a guided walking tour...just the four of us...with a script read by our designated leader...Diane! So windy and...

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Jun 29, 2011 - Arcos

After 7 hours of sleep we walk to the bus stop, leaving Sevilla and get on (all 11 of us)the #16 bus heading to Acros de la Frontera.......a sleepy little town (population 35K) situated on what used to be the border between Christian and Muslim regions....built high on a cliff overlooking a deep gorge.......again beautiful like everything else here.... We.took a guided tour of the town this afternoon, led by Jose, a local who is passionate about the town and history.......narrow windy streets with lots of ups and downs, and ended up at a...

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Spain Adventures

Jun 28, 2011 - Sevilla,continued

Sevilla ..... Continued Sevilla is a town with winding allies, street names that change often and hardly a directional sign(s) to guide us. We found this town the most difficult to navigate. We learned that even the maps were not accurate. We accepted the fact we were going to get lost and lost we were. The day started with a phone call to Conception Delgado to reserve a spot in her Sevilla Show and Tell Tour, she came highly recommend by Rick. Using him as her guinea pig together they designed this 2 hour tour - cost 15€. At the time, she...

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Spain Adventures

Jun 19, 2010 - No Bull in the Bullring

With 40,000 people, Ronda is one of the largest white hill towns in Andalucia. It’s also one of the most spectacular, thanks to its breathtaking gorge-straddling setting. The one hour drive there took us through beautiful rolling countryside, field after field of sunflowers swaying in the gentle breeze and craggy hills rising majestically into the blue sky. After packing the car under the main square we headed for Ronda’s famed bullring. Ronda is the birthplace of modern bullfighting and this was the first great Spanish bullring. While...

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Jun 18, 2010 - Religious Oddities

Our hotel is located between two Catholic churches. The Church of Santa Maria is a minutes’ walk away to our west, overlooking the square where we park our car. After Arcos was taken from the Moors in the 13th century, this church was build atop a mosque. About two minutes walk in the opposite direction from our hotel is Arcos’ second church, St Peter’s. It dates from the 14th century and was built on the remains of a former Moorish fortress. We hear its bell chiming the hours from 7am until 11pm. In the 1700s, the parishes of St Mary’s and...

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Jun 17, 2010 - Equestrian Ballet

The city of Jerez, 30 minutes drive from Arcos, is famous for two things: horses and sherry. We planned to sample both today. The Royal Anadalusian School of Equestrian Art is a university that trains students in the art of dressage. Twice a week, on Tuesdays and Thursdays, the school puts on an equestrian ballet with choreography, Spanish music and costumes from the 19th century. We arrived in time to see some of the stable hands exercising and training some horses before the show got underway. We were not permitted to take any photos of...

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Jun 16, 2010 - Arcos de la Frontera

I am sitting on the terrace of our hotel room. One hundred metres below, the sleepy Guadalete River cuts its path between the hill we are on and orange groves and small farms on the opposite bank. We are in Arcos de la Frontera, an Andalucian hill town that sits on a long, narrow hilltop and tumbles down the back of the ridge like the train of a wedding dress. We are in the old part of the city on the edge of a labyrinthine wonderland of narrow cobblestone streets and white-painted buildings. To get here, we had to squeeze the car through...

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Apr 28, 2010 - They won !

Hi all, We were driving to Arcos dela Frontera when we encountered a festival group.....they were celebrating the fact that the Christians conquered the Muslims, ages ago.......all dressed up and with their horses and carriages....dancing and singing ;-) Arcos was another nice white town, located on a steep hill cliff, very nice ! till next time.........

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Sep 21, 2007 - Ronda and Arcos de la Frontera

Friday we left Nerja and drove along the coast to Malaga and then up into the mountains to Ronda. Ronda is split by a deep gorge into the old and new town. Both of these terms being somewhat relative. The old town being a Moorish stronghold dating back to the 12th century and the new town to the late 1700's. The two towns being joined by the 'New Bridge' built over the gorge in 1790. We spent some time exploring the old part of the town and found an old Moorish house where they had dug a secret flight of stairs down to the bottom of the...

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