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Read and rate Travel Journal Entries for Attapu, Laos

Jan 14, 2010 - Tim: Attapeu

On my way by 8:30 and I felt pretty good. When I went to bed last night I wasn't sure if I would be able to walk today. Leaving the village just on the eastern edge I saw a big handmade sign stating COFFEE. Up on the plateau this word means plantation, warehouse or it has some other industrial meaning. They don't drink it they just grow it. Oh! While on the subject, I forgot to mention in the last post that Lao Bolaven coffee is one of the world’s finest and priciest Arabica beans. So anyhow I stopped and sure enough it was a very rustic,...

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Jan 28, 2009 - Paksong to Attapeau

Hello Family and Friends, Leaving Paksong, we headed 120 km to a cool little riverside village on the south side of the Bolaven Plateau called Attipeu. The first 75 km of this ride was down a very rough dirt track through the jungle to the eastern edge of the plateau. This portion of the ride was really beautiful with a wild and out-of-the-way feel to it. A relatively dense jungle with a few ethnic villages scattered throughout. Some of the older people in the villages had very intricate tattoos all over their face. As this is a custom of...

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Nov 26, 2008 - My Son - Cham Ruins

One hour bus ride from Hoi An are the Cham ruins - My Son (translates to "beautiful mountain") - a world heritage site. Even though these are not the largest or best preserved ruins from the ancient Cham culture, it is considered one of the most significant in Vietnam. Very scenic setting with streams running through the sites and the jungle threatening to take over. Some of the ruins are well preserved, but many were apparently damaged or destroyed during the wars.

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Jun 27, 2007 - Paksong

We left the guesthouse early and made it back to Pakse by 10am where we rented a scooter. Today we were driving into the Bolevan Plateau, famous for its waterfalls and coffee plantations. The drive was a steady climb into the mountains and after about 30 minutes the climate changed dramatically. It became very cold and foggy with lots of rainy mist. We stopped at several waterfalls along the way and some of them were awesome in really beautiful settings and because it is the rainy season, they were full of powerful rushing water. We made it...

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Mar 7, 2007 - Attepeu

3-7-07 I spent the night in Sekong, a sort of wild-west type of frontier town. As far as I know I was the only Westerner there. This morning I got up early, grabbed a quick bowl of noodles, and hired a dugout to Attepeu - about 50 miles down river. It was a nice trip, except the weather was a bit foul, the sky was overcast and it sprinkled on and off for all of the six and a half hours that it took. The seating wasn't exactly first class either, not even business class. I was sitting on a bamboo mat at the bottom of the dugout, when I got...

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Mar 6, 2007 - Sekong

3-6-07 On my way with the next leg of the journey. By the time I packed and ate breakfast, I had only ten minutes to get out to Pakse's southern bus terminal. It is 8 km out, as soon as I stepped out onto the street a motorcycle/jumbo... the type with the side carriage, stopped. Not to change the subject, but just now, upstairs on the hotel's mezzanine a monk type chanting session started. I don't know what is going on, but it sure sounds great. Very soothing, I'm getting sleepy. It is still going after the ten minutes it took me to type...

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Mar 29, 2006 - To Attepeu

29 March 06 - To Attepeu I really could have done with more sleep, but got up at 0600 and had a quick breakfast, and said goodbye to Donna. No sign of the others, surprisingly enough. I got a lift at 0715 to a town nearby called Beng from where I was to get a songthaew to Tha Taeng and then change transport to Attepeu. I sat and waited until 0840, but watching the poor people in the town wandering around mostly wearing very dirty clothes and also needing a good wash. Fortunately we weren't squashed into the songthaew like I often have been...

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Feb 10, 2006 - Tribal villages

We were somewhat ambivalent about these tribal visits, often felt like gawking in a zoo as we sauntered through their village. But Vieng assured us that they don't mind. Indeed their reaction to our visit was from indifference to mild curiosity or amusement. We on the other hand saw them pursuing their everyday chores. Often the village pump was the center of activities. We could see that they are not spoiled (yet?) by tourism. There is no begging or aggressive selling either. Probably there is not that much to sell, though in one village...

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Laos 2006

Feb 9, 2006 - Muang Saysettha

We stayed for two nights in Attapeu in a recently privatized hotel, the best in town. It was previously a government establishment for visiting functionaries. It has to be seen to believe it: the cavernous high-ceilinged room with bare walls and tile floor had no charm, but was very clean. According to one of the guide books the room rates were $4 to $10 - we probably had the best. In the morning we went to see two temples. The Wat Luang Muang Mai is in the center of the town. A more interesting excursion was to Muang Saysettha. We took a...

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Laos 2006

Feb 8, 2006 - Boloven Plateau to Attapeu

The next day we were off to the Boloven Plateau in the south-east corner of Laos. It is the weathered remains of a long extinct volcano. It was not farmed intensively until the French introduced coffee, tea, banana and rubber cultivation that thrived in the rich soil, but never on a large scale. Some enterprising Lao brought in durian plants from Thailand and there are now plantations for that too. The fruit is highly prized by the Thai as they grow without fertilizer in the rich volcanic soil and ripen naturally, all of which make it...

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Laos 2006



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