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Read and rate Travel Journal Entries for Tabriz, Iran

Dec 5, 2006 - Behind the Veil - Part 2

Tabriz was kak. It was cold and it was unfriendly. Seriously unfriendly. We weren't allowed to stay in the cheapy hotel, because the manager didn't believe we were married and he might get a visit from the Morality Police if he allowed a honkey to shack up with a muslim gal. I mean, c'mon, we've been married for nearly 5 years now, what the hell kinda immoral things would be going on in our room? Nagging ain't immoral last time I heard. He didn't budge. We had to take our 2nd hit on hotel rooms, this time paying $30 for a pretty dirtbag...

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Fuzz & Phil Run Away

Jun 29, 2006 - Tabriz

Hello Friends Crossing into Iran from Turkey was much easier than we expected. The Turkish side went very smoothly and again Claude made it easier for us. The police let us through with a few laughs and half conversations. Dad got mock arrested on the boarder when he had to change from shorts to longs and the police marched him down a hall to a room with his arm behind his back. Once through to the Iran side we met our guide Nasser Khan, who helped us race through the formalities. A combination of his knowledge of the process, language and...

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Apr 30, 2006 - Tabriz

Marco Polo ha sido el viajero y comerciante mas famoso de todos los que han atravesado Asia a traves de la Ruta de la Seda. El lo hizo en el siglo XIII cuando todas las tierras por las que pasaba esta ruta (o rutas porque habia mas de una) estaban bajo el dominio de Kublai Khan, cuarto emperador de los tartaros (tribu mongola) y descendiente de Gengis Khan. Marco Polo se quedo tiempo en Tabriz aunque yo solo estare de paso. Esto es lo que Marco Polo dejo escrito de Tauris (Tabriz) que transcribo a continuacion sin importarme para nada el...

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Nov 22, 2005 - We feel very safe here, except when we cross the road

For all of you who have been worried about our safety while in Iran (or our sanity for wanting to go), you can stop worrying. Actually, if you are the worrying type, you should worry about our safety due to the INSANE traffic here. (Cars, buses, little old guys pushing carts of produce, motorcycles by the dozens, and pedestrians all mix it up together with little help from standard traffic lights. The way to cross the street on foot is to go between gaps in the cars, one lane at a time, until you're across. The way to make a left turn...

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Aug 25, 2005 - Tabriz at last

We spent 4 hours at the border. Not because there were any problems (apart from payment of speeding fines by some of our colleagues) but because that is how long it takes. During this time it was extremely hot and the car was sitting in the sun. On setting off, at last, the engine in the Aston was extremely unhappy and we had very little power. The previous day we had had trouble at the first of the high passes with power loss and decided that the car was running much too rich (although the second pass at 8,500 ft had been much better after...

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Aug 2, 2005 - Tabriz

Finalmente salí de Ankara a las 5 de la tarde (ayer) y crucé la frontera esta tarde, en el cruce a uno lo acompaña el bíblico Monte Ararat. En seguida seguimos, con unos lituanos, hacia Tabriz pero no alcanzamos allí el tren a Teherán de las 8 p. m., que era mejor opción que el bus por el camarote. Así que dormiré y descansaré en Tabriz sin haberlo planeado, aunque fue un punto importante en la ruta de la seda, de hecho, Marco Polo estuvo aquí; fui al bazar pero ya era muy tarde. Dos diferencias observadas rápidamente entre Turquía e Irán,...

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Ruta de la Seda

Apr 8, 2005 - The Computer Situation

When I was younger the only thing I carried in my backpack that needed power was my camera. A new battery every few weeks and that was it. These days my backpack is so full of electronic shit I can hardly keep track of it - computer, cameras, iPod and all those cords, chargers, card readers, external drives, USB sticks, spare batteries and adaptors. The key to it all is my laptop, without which the rest soon becomes useless. So when my (until now) trusty Fujitsu - constant companion over the last three years - died on me I was more than a...

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Andrew Burke in Iran



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