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Read and rate Travel Journal Entries for Banjul, Gambia

Feb 16, 2020 - the Gambia

Africa, a bit like the number 9 bus; you wait years to make a trip and two come along together; hot on the heels of Ethiopia, we were suddenly faced with the prospect of spending February in Borisland. so time to try the Western side of the continent in one of Africa's smallest countries: the Gambia. It is all to easy to find you have crossed the border into Senegal, the country surrounding Gambia on all sides, so we will fit in a trip there too to explore their wildlife. Quite a few visitors come here for the fantastic birdlife on offer so...

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Apr 22, 2013 - Banjul, The Gambia

No folks, it's not a mis-type. The name of the country really is "The Gambia". There were options again today. We chose the city tour, which included the National Museum, Arc d’Triomphe (Arch 22 monument), & a walk through the Albert Market. After the market, we headed to Serrekunda to visit a batik factory and see how it’s made. Captain’s Banquet tonight, so everyone got dressed up & took photos in the lounge after dinner. We looked pretty good. Dinner with Rastko & Monica and Gerri & Bruce. When we returned to the ship some local...

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Nov 3, 2012 - Homeward bound - Banjul

Got to Freetown Airport and was quizzed by about 4 people because I hadn't printed out my ticket! A bit difficult as I explained when most of their cafe don't have printing facilities and the connections are all crap - then did I have a visa for Gambia - no - don't need one...took about an hour but patience paid off and finally given a boarding slip..phew! Arik Air small but reasonable plane first come for seats which was OK as it was no where near full. Banjul Airport - no problem here except for the fact that as I suspected my onward...

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Jan 30, 2008 - Banjul

Every time I think a trip can't be worse than the last ones I get one that proves me wrong, how can it possibly take 18 hours to travel just over 300km? Getting out early was recommended so I got up at 6am, out of the hotel by 7am and at the bus station and on the bus by 7:30. The bus looked a wreck but the first hour was surprisingly comfortable, the second hour was quite bearable, the third hour was tediously boring and in the forth hour I saw someone selling boxes of 100 paracetemol and was seriously tempted. In the fifth hour someone...

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Jan 17, 2008 - Jaq and Ian the Beard arrive

Sarges is a bit of a dump, but a welcomed break. Phil came over with his mate Mark. Mark recently sold Dentons Fishing village but still lives here and does fishing. John, Ian and I went off with the two of them to find a mechanic. Phils mechanic couldnt get to us but then we found another one in a bar! I took the Shogun over to Petes garage and he confirmed that the alternator was naff. He will fix it free of charge (as far as the labour is concerned) cos it is for charity. Thank you Pete. Now comes the tricky bit, we will still take it to...

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Nov 14, 2006 - Gambia - Tendaba

-Sumole! -Ebeye! -Kotanante! -Tanante! These towns we're visiting in central Gambia are difficult to reach for independent travellers, because they are five or seven kilometres off the main road. We had to ask the campament manager in Bintang to give us a lift to Sibanor in order to get a bush-taxi to Kwinella, from where we had to call the campenent in Tendaba to come and pick us up. It's not easy at all, but surprisingly everything works in the end and we are now in Tendaba, in a bungalow by the River Gambia, surrounded by the beautiful...

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Trip Journal


Senegal & Gambia

Nov 12, 2006 - Gambia - Bintang

-Sumole! -Ebeye! -Kotanante! -Tanante! We managed to cross the corrupt border to Gambian with no incidents. They registered absolutely everything we had on us, but it was done with a smile and more out of curiousity than anything else. The bush-taxi (Gambia's version of a Ndiaga Ndiaye) we took in Kafountine took us all the way to Brikama, a hectic Gambian city you just want to get out of the minute you enter it. We had to wait there for three long hours though for our next bush-taxi to part for Bintang (i.e. as long as it takes for the...

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Trip Journal


Senegal & Gambia

Nov 9, 2006 - Senegal - Casamance - Kafountine

-Kasumay! -Kasumay Lama! We endured the heat of Casamance in a Ndiaga Nidiaye from Elinkine to back to Ziginchor, spent another night in this city, and took another Ndiaga Ndiaye to Kafountine the following day and finally made it! Transport is definitely something else in Senegal, a real test to one's patience and endurance. Kafountine was great, a long strand of white sand with hardly any people whatsoever, the perfect place to chill-out and restore one's energy. We found a little bungalow by the beach and decided to take it easy for a...

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Trip Journal


Senegal & Gambia

Dec 10, 2005 - From Tumani Tenda to Serekunda

Start: Tumani Tenda End: Serekunda Weather: Overcast & Cool It was still dark when I awoke and the sun was yet to rise when I left after packing. Not wanting to stop to chat I silently slipped past the nightwatchman in the dining shelter and retraced my steps along the path through the village to the 'worst road in Africa'. Despite rising before dawn it already seemed unlikely that I would be able to get to the YMCA in Serekunda by the agreed time and the wait for a minibus ruled it out completely. The now familiar journey to Brikama and...

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Dec 7, 2005 - From Tendaba to Tumani Tenda

Weather: Hot Woke early and worked on my journal until dawn. In the early morning I went for a walk in the direction of Kiang West National Park in the hope of seeing an animal or two. I didn't need to go far to see the usual suspects: monkeys, that were in trees near the camp; and, birds, which were everywhere. New birds included a small, black bird with red breast (that I was unable to photograph because it flew fast and stayed within foliage), black & white starlings, pelicans and green parrots. I turned back when the morning heated up...

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Nov 10, 2005 - Banjul, Gambia

Gambia is the smallest country in Africa. In essence it is fifteen miles on either side of the Gambia River. Our visit here only served to confirm my impression that if you had to be a colony, the British were the best mother country to have. Things were definitely an improvement over Senegal, which belonged to the French. An organized infrastructure had been left behind and many people had the opportunity to have at least a primary school education. To see the sights we climbed into four wheel drive trucks that the British had left here...

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