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Read and rate Travel Journal Entries for Algonquin Provincial Park, Ontario, Canada

Sep 15, 2011 - Montreal - Algonquin Park (Dwight)

Montreal (Quebec) - Dwight /Algonquin Park (Ontario) 520 Km Algonquin Lakeside Inn Na het heerlijke 4 gangen ontbijt, dit keer geserveerd door Kent, zijn we in de regen vertrokken richting Ottawa. Het was een tamelijk lange rit omdat de laatste 250 km een provinciale weg was. Net voor Ottawa klaarde het op en begon de route echt mooi te worden. We hebben een tussenstop gemaakt bij de Wal-Mart in Renfrew. Daarna reden we over de schitterende provinciale weg door het mooie beboste landschap en de laatste 50 km door Algonquin Park met zijn...

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Sep 26, 2010 - Lake of Bays, Dorset and Hunstville

After a late start our final day in the area saw us exploring the area outside the park. This area is very much “cottage” country for people from Toronto and so there are many small settlements. We stopped for coffee in the small town of Dorset located on the Lake of Bays. Alongside the dock was S.S Bigwin a recently restored ferry ship which started life in 1910, ferrying passengers around the lake and particularly to Bigwin Inn on Bigwin Island a major resort .in the 1930s. We continued around the lake admiring the colours and finished...

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Sep 25, 2010 - Beaver ponds but no moose

Our second day in Algonquin saw us enjoying once again the spectacular autumn colours. We headed to the east side of the park to walk the Beaver Pond Trail which was aptly named. The trail winds through the Algonquin rugged terrain and offered excellent opportunities to observe the activities of the beaver, even though we did not see a beaver. By damming a stream the beaver changes the environment to suit their needs creating a beaver pond one to two metres deep. The pond in the summer provides the beaver with a safe refuge from predators....

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Sep 24, 2010 - Autumn colours at their best

We spent three days in and around Algonquin Provincial Park the oldest provincial park in Canada, being created in 1893. Prior to the parks establishment, in the mid 1800’s pioneer loggers pushing up from the Ottawa Valley reached Algonquin in search of White Pine trees. By the time the park was established most of the Algonquin’s big pine had been cut and fires had ravaged large areas. The park was established to serve as a wildlife sanctuary and to protect the headwaters of five major rivers which flow from the Park from agriculture....

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Jul 17, 2010 - Logs, Bogs and Beavers

the many charms of Algonquin Provincial Park Saturday Today we explored some of the features of this big, beautiful park and it was a fascinating journey from dawn ‘til dusk. At the Visitor Center we learned that Algonquin was carved out by four succeeding glaciers, the last one receding only 11,000 years ago, and it is covered in three very different kinds of forest. The two largest and most commercially valuable forests are sugar maple growing in areas of ‘till’, and white pine growing in areas where there is sandy soil. The third type of...

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Trip Journal


2010 Race 2 Finish

Jul 16, 2010 - Turning West

The long trek toward home begins Today we left Ottawa and all it’s grand attractions, and we turned our wheels west toward home. It will take us two months to get there and there is still much to see along the way, but most days of driving now will bring us closer to home instead of farther from it. Our first destination was Algonquin Provincial Park, a large and popular park 150 miles west of Ottawa. It is Friday and the Ottawa campground is booked solid for the weekend. We hoped there would be some space available at Algonquin. The drive...

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Trip Journal


2010 Race 2 Finish

Sep 19, 2009 - Algonquin Park

Ontario’s famous Northern park, Algonquin, is known for it’s canoeing, wildlife viewing and is meant to embody much of the ‘Canadian experience’. It is the largest chain of lakes in North America and is a huge park- 7,725 sq km (bigger than PEI). Unlike a lot of North American parks, it is almost completely unroaded and most of the access into the park is only via canoe. We spent 4 days in this park, doing a canoe trip up into the wilderness. As any canoer knows, any type of head wind sucks in a canoe. As we loaded up and got ready to go,...

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May 1, 2007 - The End

Well, this is it. We can hardly believe we made it a full year and haven't killed each other. We have seen some amazing places, people, sights, and smells. We saw a lot of beaches and a lot of pools. We watched our kids growing, despite our thinking that sometimes they were regressing. We are now in our new home in Foresters Falls, and trying to settle into a new routine. Thanks to all of you for keeping in touch with us. Until the next great adventure. Dave, Cheryl, Kayley, and Peter

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Jun 30, 2006 - Deux Rivieres - A beautiful and peaceful place for day's end.

Friday Canada Day celebrations and full campgrounds brought us to this terrific little campground on Rte. 17 in Deux Rivieres, Ont. We traveled about 350 miles today - finally got out of the awful rain and this evening is sunny, warm, and very clear. The sunset over the little lake should be pretty. This is beautiful country, and getting quite woodsy and rural. Our internet satellite set-up seems to be working well this far north (although we lost the signal last night during the thunder storms). We should be back in the States tomorrow...

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Jul 4, 2005 - Beavers, Moose and Bears

On Monday we picked up a hire car and drove north from Toronto to Algonquin Provincial Park, where we hired a tent and set-up camp at Kearney Lake. The park has a number of trails and we managed to walk a couple of the short ones on Monday afternoon - 'the Lookout', from which, as the name suggests, we got good views of the park and 'Beaver Pond Trail', where we didn't see any beavers but did see a moose at the other side of a lake. We were able to watch it for quite a while and it didn't seem at all phased by us being there. Back at our...

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Jun 12, 2004 - Survival course ends!

The midnight march was along roads and mostly downhill, thank goodness! It was actually quite beautiful in the sense that you just looked up at the night sky (full of stars) and let your peripheral vision guide you down the road. We were like zombies, together Tom, Adam and I, marching quickly into the blackness. My rear was a bother, I elected to use my lib balm to ease the pain of the friction/chafing down there; not exactly what it was intended for but it helped - I hate to think how my underwear will look at the end. Note to self: don't...

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