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Read and rate Travel Journal Entries for Foz de Iguaçu, Paraná, Brazil

Oct 10, 2012 - Week 2 - Paraty, Foz do Iguacu, Ciudad Del Este (Brazil & Paraguay)

On our last full day in Paraty we decided to go kayaking around the bay and into the mangroves with a guide. It was more of a sprint than a relaxing paddle but we did see thousands of colourful crabs in the mangroves that the guide told us had eaten a man alive but a year ago... (!?!) Issues The sun was out and I had burnt legs to prove it and the sea was so warm it was like being in a jacuzzi. The following morning we were up early and packed and headed to the bus station across town for our journey to Foz. The first step was a luxurious...

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Oct 21, 2011 - Iguaçu Falls

Hiya, A 24 hour bus ride from Rio, on the border between Brazil and Argentina, lie the Iguaçu Falls. 3km wide and 80 metres high the 275 individual falls make stunning viewing. You can view the falls from both sides of the border - the Brazilian side gives you a more panoramic overview of the falls from the other side of the river, whereas the Argentinian side you can walk through walkways on the same side the falls are coming down. Both sides are equally impressive, although I much preferred the Brazilian side and being able to see a...

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Jan 13, 2009 - Foz de Iguacu

January 13, 2009: Our Iguacu experience We woke up very early, skipped breakfast, and drove to the airport. The airport is called airoparque and we flew on aerolineas argentinas. We were on time (for once!) and got through security easily and boarded the plane. We were delayed at the gate for about half an hour which was unfortunate because the entire reason we took the early flight was to get our Brazilian visas before the consulate closes (at noon). We finally took off and about an hour later we found out that they were stopping for gas...

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Jul 20, 2007 - Day 23 -- Touring Sao Paulo

Day 23 -- Friday, July 20 -- Touring Sao Paulo Well, here in Brazil, I no longer have to worry about being eaten by a lion or trampled by a hippo or elephant. But, the last week of my trip has, perhaps, even greater dangers. In the cities in Brazil, the crime rates are very high. Most are petty non-violent crimes, like pickpockets. But, in some areas in the big cities, the drug lords are so powerful that the police are afraid to enter their territories. And, the language here is Portuguese. I only know a few Portuguese words to be even a...

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