Kapoor Year 14B: India And COVID-19 travel blog

As We Passed A Group Of Camels Beside The Highway, Our Driver...

We Piled Out Of The Car And I Went With The Driver...

Some Of The Young Ones Had Been Born During The Night, They...

This Wee One Was Sitting So Upright And Looking Very Alert, But...

This Little Fella Looks Like A Clone Of His Mother, And Has...

Donna And I Dove Right In, Anil And Duncan Stayed Back Behind...

This Sleepy Youngster Is Definitely Not A Newborn, But He's Still A...

We Were Pleased That The Owner Of The Camels Was Willing To...

These Two Must Be Prone To Wandering, Because Their Forelegs Are Tied...

I Noticed This Unusual Scarring On Most Of The Camels Cheeks, I...

I'm Not Sure Why My Camera Muted The Colours Like It Did,...


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KAPOORS ON THE ROAD

About an hour after leaving Jaisalmer, on our way to Jodhpur, I could see that we were approaching a spot where a camel herder had settled down his herd beside the road. Now I’ve loved camels for a very long time, ever since I spent almost a year in Khartoum, Sudan back in 1972-73. You don’t get a lot of opportunity to see them outside of zoos, but there were lots that afternoon.

To my surprise, our driver pulled over to the side of the road, telling us that there were newborns in the group, some must have been born the previous night because he didn’t see them the day before when he was coming back from Jodhpur. Oh my, oh wow!

I couldn’t get out of the van fast enough, and Donna was right behind me. I was careful before crossing the road, and the driver took care that the others did to. I think this must be a regular happening, and perhaps the camel driver keeps his animals in this spot during the tourist season, in order to make a little extra cash from baksheesh visitors would give him for feed for the camels.

It didn’t matter to me; I don’t think we would have stopped if it wasn’t to see the babies. The driver cleared things with the herder and we were told not to get to close to the new mothers as they would be feeling especially protective. Well yeah!

I look a load of photos and can hardly bear to part with any of them. My one regret and disappointment was that I tried taking some video footage, but in my excitement, I seemed to have started filming and then hit the stop button, so most of what I ended up with were one or two seconds of movement. The longest I managed to shoot was just over seven seconds, but I’m sharing it with you anyway.

Anil and Duncan stayed outside the roped-off area and watched from a distance. I asked our driver to take a photo of Donna and I together before we left, and then I slipped the camel driver a hundred-rupee note. He seemed pleased, he didn’t look disappointed, and playfully twirled the ends of his moustache. Here’s a little of the video I shot, don’t blink, it’s pretty short unfortunately:

Baby Camels In Rajasthan


After seeing the newborn camels, I was a little intrigued by the birth process. I wondered if the female gave birth standing, sitting or lying down. I searched on line for a video of a camel giving birth and found it fascinating. Here’s a link to the video if you’re interested too:

Camel Giving Birth


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