Kapoor Year 14B: India And COVID-19 travel blog

After Arriving Back In Bhuj, Mr. Singh Drove Us To The Museum...

I Found Some Information And Photos On The Internet, And Then I...

I Should Have Taken A Photo As We Walked In The Door,...

These Decorative Cloth Pieces Are Often Hung At The Entrance To An...

We Were Welcomed Into A Large Room With Large Shelving Units Crammed...

Mr. Wazir Emerged From Another Doorway And Sat Down While His Sons...

It Felt Like A Sales Showroom, But Most Of The Textiles Were...

There Was Such A Wide Varied Of Embroidery Styles And Colours It...

I Thought This One A Real Hodgepodge, It Was Like Someone Had...

This Was The Design At The Centre Of The Previous Photo

I Almost Thought He Was Holding It Upside Down, But This Was...

This Piece Reminded Me Of A Checkerboard, So Many Squares, The Border...

This Old Piece Included A Great Deal Of Cut-Work Appliqué Along With...

Cute Little Buttons Were Sewn On With Tiny, Tiny Beads Making Flowers...

This Item Was The One Thing That Intrigued Me The Most, A...

When He Turned It Around You Could See The Opening, The Bottom...

When The Top Was Folded Over The Lower Half, It Could Be...

Next Mr. Wazir Had His Son Bring Out Some Much Older Pieces

This One Was Clearly Used A Great Deal, The Colours Have Faded...

I Zoomed In On A Very Unusual Design, It Looks Like A...

And Just Look At How The Fingers And Toes Are Depicted On...

This Piece Is Reputed To Be 150 Years Old, It Would Be...

I Got This Photo From The Internet, People Come From Around The...


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BACKGROUND

Here’s some of what the Lonely Planet – India chapter Gujarat has to say about Mr. A. A. Wazir:

“If you’re interested in antique embroidery, contact Mr. A.A. Wazir, opposite the General Hospital, Bhuj. He has a stunning collection of more than 3,000 pieces, about half of which are for sale.”

KAPOORS ON THE ROAD

Because the collection of antique embroidery is promoted as being in a textile museum, we were a little surprised to be ushered into a large room at the front of what is clearly an upscale home in a residential neighbourhood. We were seated on chairs and observed that the walls of the room were lined with large shelving units, piled high with folded, highly-decorated fabrics.

After a few minutes, Mr. Wazir appeared and began to tell us a little about his life-long mission to collect and preserve a wide variety of textiles from around India. When he was finished, I told him that I had studied textiles at university and had long admired the regional costumes as well as the temple and household textiles I’d seen as we had travelled extensively around India. When given the opportunity to see textiles in museums, I was sure to spend a significant amount of time admiring the weaving techniques and the methods used to decorate the fabrics.

I also noted that we were not in the market to purchase fabrics at this time because we were travelling on to Rajasthan after visiting Gujarat, and then our plan was to spend a couple of weeks in Nepal before flying to Europe for the month of April. I was pleased that he took my words to heart, and showed us only items from his antique collection, items that we not for sale.

Knowing there was no pressure to buy anything, I threw myself into looking closely at the various textiles that his sons brought out to show us. There was an impressive cross-section of beautiful works of art, some more that 150 years old. There was an unusual folding bag that really caught my attention, it’s a good thing it wasn’t for sale because I would have been sorely tempted.

Here’s a short video I found on the internet, click here to view:

An Afternoon with A. A. Wazir


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