Off to South America travel blog

Street

Street

Colonial house

Restored original colonial house

Colonial house

Colonial house

Colonial House

Bakery

Street market

Frivolous

Entrepenuer

Museum of artifacts from indigenous people

Musuem

Town Square

Town Square

Town Square

Town Square

Town Square

Center of Town Square

Driving back to the ship

Street scenes

Street scenes

Driving back

Driving back

Driving back

Driving back

Driving back

Driving back

Mountain near the port and the city; big and dry

Local art

Driving back

Driving back

Not so pretty street art

Driving back

Driving back

Driving back

Driving back

The topography of the area

Houses on the dry mountain

Driving back

Gated community

Water tower on dry mountain

Big dry mountain

Close up of big dry mountain


Today is Thursday January 9. We are settling into a routine - gym, coffee, eat, tour or lecture, eat, nap, read, eat. Very nice!

Today we're still off the coast of Peru. Salaverry is a port located near the city of Trujillo. The city is rich with colonial architecture and very important archaeological centers of the pre-Inca era. It is Peru's third largest city. And it was once the home of Simon Bolivar. Bolivar liberated much of northern South America from the rule of Spain in 1819.

What was very, very interesting is that the Inca's were not the first people of Peru. They were preceded by the Moche and the Chimu peoples. They thrived throughout northern Peru, roughly between 100 AD-800 AD. The Moche people left behind a varied collection of artifacts, most notably perhaps of which are the Moche pottery offerings. The Inca's didn't get there until sometime in the 13th century.

In Trujillo, we visited the Archaeological Museum of the National University of Trujillo. It is located in a 17th-century house. The museum displays a collection of artifacts that trace the region's history starting with the arrival of the first inhabitants 12,000 years ago. We saw ceramics that were very well preserved; mummies and relics unearthed in the Moche pyramids nearby

We visited Trujillo's bustling city center, an area full of beautifully preserved colonial architecture. They include a 17th-century cathedral, the ornate city hall and several historical residences once owned by affluent colonial families.

In the center of the city square is the Freedom Monument. Trujillo became the first Peruvian city to proclaim its intention to become independent from Spanish colonial rule.

Aside from the nice things we saw, we had to drive through the very poor section of the town. It finally dawned on us that one of the reasons Chile and Peru are so poor is that it doesn't rain in the coastal areas. They have to depend on the rivers that flow out of the Andes to irrigate their crops. It was very depressing and sad. And we're not even in Central America yet. No wonder so many people are trying to get out and come to North America.

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