Larry & Lee Ann's Journey travel blog

Let's peek into the Days of '76 Museum...

Welcome!

The wagons etc are lined up inside in rows, like this...

Farm wagon Info...

Wagon...

Freight wagon info...

Freight wagon...

Hearses Info...

The white hearse was especially nice...

Buggy/Sleigh...

Mail wagon Info...

I thought this one was really cool!

Info...

Dump Wagon...

Info...

Hook/Ladder Cart...

Stake-Bed Dray Wagon...

 

Info...

Brewer's Truck...

This is the one Larry spent the most time reading about, lol!

Info...

Lovely carriage...

Info...

The Rockaway...

Info...

Check out the front wheels on this Phaeton...

More info...

Info...

Concord Stage...

Hope you enjoyed a peek inside the museum...More to see tomorrow! :)


Today's post covers part one of our visit to the Days of '76 Museum located in Deadwood, SD. You might remember that I mentioned in an earlier post that we attended Deadwood Stagecoach Days with our friends the Ramblin' Rangers. Brad & Bonnie provided three hours of entertainment during the event. After they were done with their gig we toured the museum for a couple of hours. The event & museum were well worth attending & we plan to come again next year. I took too many pics for one post so will post in two parts. I hope you enjoy reading & seeing some of the wagons, coaches, clothing, guns & other memorabilia stored in this museum, we certainly did!

The Days of ’76 began as a way to honor Deadwood’s first pioneers - the prospectors, miners, muleskinners and madams who poured into the Black Hills in 1876 to settle the gold-filled gulches of Dakota Territory.

Since the first celebration in 1924, the Days of ‘76 has grown into a legendary annual event with a historic parade and an award-winning PRCA rodeo.

The Days of ’76 museum began informally, as a repository for the horse drawn wagons and stage coaches, carriages, clothing, memorabilia and archives generated by the Celebration.

In 1990 Don Clowser installed his collection of important Old West Pioneer and American Indian artifacts, archives, firearms and archives into the pole barn that was the museum. Added to what was recognized as the largest collection of horse-drawn vehicles in the state, it became clear that the Days of ’76 Museum needed a new home.

In 2004 the board of the Days of ‘76 Museum, supported with a $3,000,000 gift from the City of Deadwood, pledged to construct a new $5.25 million, 32,000-square-foot home for its collections of Western and American Indian artifacts, archives, photos and artwork. You can now visit the museum for the affordable rate of Adults $5.50, Children 7-13 $2.50, Children 6 & under free

Stop back tomorrow for Part Two which covers the collectibles, photos, guns etc. And thanks for stopping by, have a wonderful day!



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