Larry & Lee Ann's Journey travel blog

Arriving in Terre Haute to do a bit of exploring...

Cute businesses in the downtown area...

Arriving at the Hulman Building...

A view of the building in the 1930's. Check out the traffic!

Inside these dorrs is a bakery straight ahead, cafe to the left...

Admission is free...Larry & I were the only visitor's in the museum...

It's lovely in here. Beautiful brick & wood work....

The displays are well done & very informative...

Mr. Hulman & his story...

A little info for you...

Lovely room...

You can't enter the parlor so this shot is through an opening...

This was one of Larry's favorite display's today...

While this was probably my favorite!

Interesting...

I especially like the Broiler Drawer...

Cool fridge...

Fridge 'emblem'...Cool!

A couple of kitchen antiques...

Shortcake anyone?

How to build a fire...

You may own a stove similar to this one. Perhaps the instructions...

Delivery wagon info...

It is in very nice condition...

Cool stuff...Wonder what it's like to ride the bike?

Being an ex-telephone guy Larry was very interested in this display...

Inside a very old safe...

Of course there are plenty of 'old' Clabber cans to see...

Do you recognize any of these?

See anyone you might know?

Let's go into the store...

Meat counter to the left...

Price list...

Interesting!

Please have your ration points!

Back out in the hall...

Different Tavern name...

Dey Info...

Now that's a time clock!

Interesting, dial telegraph!

Larry enjoyed messing with this...

Beautiful handwriting in this ledger...

Nice colors & patterns on the outside cover too!

"Handyhot" !

Antique Laboratory Equipment info...

Any science geeks out there?

How cute is this!

Sound familiar???

The truth?

Lovely lady on the prize list...

Thanks Clabber Girl! We had an interesting couple of hours, well done!


Today's post cover's Larry & I enjoying the Clabber Girl Museum, adjacent to the building where Clabber Girl Baking Powder developed by Hulman & Co. is still manufactured at 9th & Wabash in Terre Haute, Indiana. Examples of Hulman & Company products and brands are on display as well as an antique race car and a Clabber Girl delivery wagon. We had a great time exploring the beautifully restored building where we were transported back in time with the antique household items, kitchen appliances, vintage toys, and the list goes on. There is an adjoining Bake Shop offering high quality, delicious, breakfast, lunch, and homemade bakery items. Also serving the imperial blend of Rex Coffee, roasted exclusively for Clabber Girl. In fact, Larry purchased a pound of it to enjoy at home! I, on the other hand, resisted a cute t-shirt with 'I Woke Up With Rex' emblazoned on it, lol!

The area for today’s contemporary museum has been renovated, but visitors still walk on the building’s original wood flooring. Displays show a replica of the Victorian parlor with the founders’ original furniture. Old products from the business’ early days line the walls. A 1940s kitchen with an old refrigerator and stove take a spot on the floor. The original green, yellow and red Clabber Girl carriage from 1905 is also on display.

The original Hulman family-owned wholesale grocery business opened in 1849 and had six floors that shoppers could walk around and buy products. In 1869, the business expanded with the addition of a storeroom and spice mill. In September 1893, the company went through another expansion, and Clabber Girl Baking Powder opened in its current location at the corner of Ninth and Main streets in Terre Haute, IN. I found it interesting to learn that when the Terre Haute building opened in 1893, there were no electric lights, telephones or city water works. And, there were only 31 states were in the union.

While in the museum we learned that it took the talents and determination of Herman Hulman to produce a formula for the production of baking powder. The new baking powder products were named "Crystal" and Dauntless". It was Herman's dream to see the new baking powder products well established in sales in the four county area surrounding their principal business location in Indiana. As baking powder ingredients continued to be refined, improved formulas for baking powder were introduced by Hulman under the name "Milk" in 1887. From 1899 to 1923 "Clabber" baking powder was marketed until the formula was perfected and the name changed to "Clabber Girl Baking Powder."

In the 1920's Tony Hulman Jr., Herman's grandson, went on a nationwide campaign to make Clabber Girl a household name. With salesmen in every territory of the United States, he succeeded in making Clabber Girl the #1 selling baking powder in the U.S. I have one in my cabinet at this very moment! You too???? In a corner of the museum sits a 1931 Indianapolis race car. Why a race car? Tony Hulman Jr. Bought the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in 1945 as a venue to promote Clabber Girl.

Open to the public, and free of charge, this gem is open 8am-5pm Monday-Friday and 8am-3pm on Saturday. I hope you take the time to visit, we certainly enjoyed it. Sorry about the number of photos today but I actually took 3 times this amount. I suppose you ladies will find it the most interesting although there is some 'guy' stuff too! Enjoy :)



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