Our West Coast Adventures during 2013 travel blog

Road to Cape Flattery

Road to Cape Flattery

Road to Cape Flattery

Road to Cape Flattery

Road to Cape Flattery

Road to Cape Flattery

Road to Cape Flattery

Road to Cape Flattery

Road to Cape Flattery

Road to Cape Flattery

Road to Cape Flattery

Road to Cape Flattery

Road to Cape Flattery

Road to Cape Flattery

Road to Cape Flattery

Road to Cape Flattery

Road to Cape Flattery

Sekiu

Sekiu

Sekiu

Sekiu

Sekiu

Sekiu

Sekiu

Sekiu

Sekiu

Sekiu

Sekiu

Sekiu

Sekiu

Neah Bay

Neah Bay

Neah Bay

Neah Bay

Neah Bay

Neah Bay

Neah Bay

Neah Bay

Neah Bay

Cape Flattery

Cape Flattery

Cape Flattery

Cape Flattery

Cape Flattery - Crazy Couple

Cape Flattery - Crazy Couple

Cape Flattery - Crazy Couple

Cape Flattery - Crazy Couple

Cape Flattery - Crazy Couple

Cape Flattery

Cape Flattery

Cape Flattery

Cape Flattery

Cape Flattery

Cape Flattery

Cape Flattery

Cape Flattery

Cape Flattery

Cape Flattery

Cape Flattery

Cape Flattery

Cape Flattery

Cape Flattery

Cape Flattery

Cape Flattery - Cruise Ship - Carnival

Cape Flattery - Cruise Ship - Carnival

Cape Flattery - Cruise Ship - Holland America

Cape Flattery - Cruise Ship - Norwegian


We drove to the Cape Flattery that is the most remote Northwest point in the Continental United States, we were on the Washington Scenic Byway - Hwy 112. Beautiful drive along the Strait of Juan de Fuca. We stopped in Sekiu which is an Census-designated place overlooking the west side of Clallam Bay and the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Sekiu was first settled in 1879 where a salmon cannery was attempted. Sekiu is now a small year-round fishing village and is known primarily as a summer tourist destination for fishing, kayaking, birdwatching and diving. We visited Neah Bay the entracne to Cape Flattery, this is the location of the Makah Indian reservation. The population was 865 at the 2010 census. It is primarily a fishing village that has been hit hard by the various governmental regulations and moratoriums. Archaeological research suggests that the Makah people have inhabited the area now known as Neah Bay for more than 3,800 years. In the early 17th century, a mudslide engulfed part of a Makah village near Lake Ozette. The mudslide preserved several houses and their contents in a collapsed state until the 1970s when they were excavated by Makahs and archaeologists from Washington State University. Over 55,000 artifacts were recovered, representing many activities of the Makahs, from whale and seal hunting to salmon and halibut fishing; as well as toys, games, bows and arrows. Many of these artifacts are found in their Heritage Museum. Our final stop was Cape Flattery where we had two amazing encounters, the first was a crazy couple who were taking there 14 year old Jack Russell out the the NW point, they were struggling to get their "Doggy Roadster (a carriage for dogs who can't walk long distances)" over the rocks, roots, sliced logs and the boardwalk. Now in OUR defense, all informations said the walk was along a boardwalk, what wasn't said was the boardwalk was only over the marshy parts of the 0.7 mile trail. Mike had to carry Houston or the "Doggy Roadster" on the uphill return to the car. Our second encounter was seeing all the wonderful vistas along the way and the beautiful lighthouse at the entrance to the Strait of Juan de Fuca. We also saw three cruise ships on their way to Vancouver or Seattle.



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