Kapoors Year 7: Europe/Ecuador/Peru travel blog

Years Ago, Foreigners Who Couldn't Pronounce 'Saqsaywaman' Nicked-Named This Spectacular Site 'Sexy...

We Crossed Over From Q'enqo, Passing Through Grassy Fields Where Llamas And...

The Zig-Zag Walls Of The Fortress Were Unlike Anything I'd Ever Seen...

Come To Think Of It, I Don't Think I've Ever Seen An...

As We Climbed Up The Slope To Tour The Ruins The Statue...

We Went Up And Over The Saqsaywaman Fortress To The Viewpoint Over...

Cuzco Is A Sea Of Red-Tiled Rooftops At The Bottom Of The...

The Hill Opposite The Zig-Zag Walls Once Had Three Tall Towers On...

There Are Some Fine Examples Of Inca Stonework Here

Cuzco Was Meant To Resemble A Puma, Saqsaywaman The Head And The...

One Of The Stones Is Reputed To Weigh More Than 300 Tons

I'm Not Sure We Found It, But There Are Many Large Stones...

We Decided To Continue Our Walk, All The Way Into Cuzco, We...

He Looks Rather Indignant At Having Us Witness His Ablutions

The Lovely Stone Path Wound Down Through A Gully, With A Stream...

Yeah, Another Donkey To Photograph For Our Son-In-Law Geoff

Anil Had To Enlist Some Help To Hold The Donkey Still While...

Anil's Making A Face, But That's A Great Smile From The Little...

Just Above The City, We Stopped For A 'Choclo Con Maiz' (Corn...


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BACKGROUND

Excerpts from the Lonely Planet – Peru:

The four ruins closest to Cuzco are Sacsaywamán, Q’enqo, Pukapukara and Tambomachay. They can all be visited in a day – far less if you’re whisked through on a guided tour. If you only have time to visit one site, Sacsaywamán is the most important, and less than a 2km trek uphill from the Plaza de Armas in central Cuzco.

Sacsaywamán

This immense ruin of both religious and military significance is the most impressive in the immediate area around Cuzco. The long Quechua name means ‘Satisfied Falcon,’ though tourists will inevitably remember it by the mnemonic ‘sexy woman.’

Sacsaywamán feels huge, but what today’s visitor sees is only about 20% of the original structure. Soon after the conquest, the Spaniards tore down many walls and used the blocks to build their own houses in Cuzco, leaving the largest and most impressive rocks, especially those forming the main battlements.

In 1536 the fort was the site of one of the most bitter battles of the Spanish conquest. More than two years after Pizarro’s entry into Cuzco, the rebellious Manco Inca recaptured the lightly guarded Sacsaywamán and used it as a base to lay siege to the conquistadors in Cuzco. Manco was on the brink of defeating the Spaniards when a desperate last-ditch attack by 50 Spanish cavalry led by Juan Pizarro, Francisco’s brother, succeeded in retaking Sacsaywamán and putting an end to the rebellion.

Manco Inca survived and retreated to the fortress of Ollantaytambo, but most of his forces were killed. Thousands of dead littered the site after the Incas’ defeat, attracting swarms of carrion-eating Andean condors. The tragedy was memorialized by the inclusion of eight condors in Cuzco’s coat of arms.

The site is composed of three different areas, the most striking being the magnificent three-tiered zigzag fortifications. One stone, incredibly, weighs more than 300 tons. It was the ninth inca, Pachacutec, who envisioned Cuzco in the shape of a puma, with Sacsaywamán as the head, and these twenty-two zigzagged walls as the teeth of the puma.

Opposite is the hill called Rodadero, with retaining walls, polished rocks and a finely carved series of stone benches known as the Inca’s Throne. Three towers once stood above these walls. Only the foundations remain, but the 22m diameter of the largest, gives an indication of how big they must have been.

With its perfectly fitted stone conduits, this tower was probably used as a huge water tank for the garrison. Other buildings within the ramparts provided food and shelter for an estimated 5000 warriors. Most of these structures were torn down by the Spaniards and later inhabitants of Cuzco.

Between the zigzag ramparts and the hill lies a large, flat parade ground that is used for the colorful tourist spectacle of Inti Raymi, held every June 24th.

KAPOORS ON THE ROAD

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