Kapoors Year 7: Europe/Ecuador/Peru travel blog

I Took These Photos As We Flew Over Lima, Finding Out Later...

It Turned Out That This Beach Was Within Walking Distance Of Our...

A Taxi To Met Us At The Airport, And The Driver Was...

Here And There We Did See Some Greenery On The Cliffs, Wherever...

The Driver Slowed Down Long Enough For Me To Snap A Photo...

We LOVED Our Hotel, The Barranco Bed And Breakfast And Decided To...

The Next Morning We Set Out To Walk The Two Blocks To...

A Man Was Watering The Plants Along The Top Of The Cliff,...

We Headed Over To The Famous 'Bridge Of Sighs' And Found The...

While The Front Façade Has Been Maintained, I Was Shocked To See...

Now The Only Visitors Who Can Explore The Church Are The Crows

Locals Say If You Make A Wish And Cross The Bridge While...

I Can Certainly Say I Did Wish To See This Group Posing...

The Stone-Paved Path Under The Bridge Leads Down To The Beach, There's...

A Covered Walkway Leads Over The Busy Beach Highway And Onto The...

It Was A Quiet Weekday Afternoon, But The Gulls Were On Guard...

I Soon Spotted Two Comfy Beach Chairs Waiting Just For Us

This Fellow Is Clearly Enjoying A Bird's Eye View Of The Fabulous...

I Was A Little Disconcerting To See This Sign At The Beach

Our Appetites Eventually Got The Better Of Us And We Headed Up...

We Settled Into A Shady Nook With Pisco Sours, Anil's Was Lime,...

The Following Morning We Heard That A Fog Bank Had Rolled In...

We Decided To Walk North To The Neighbouring District Of Miraflores, Before...

We Had To Walk Inland Along A Freeway To Cross Over The...

And When We Reached The Upscale Mall In Miraflores We Found More...

We Walked For Hours That Day, And Covered Many, Many Kilometres -...

We Were Fortified After The Passionfruit Creamsicle And Walked All The Way...

We Took It Easy The Following Day And Wandered Around Barranco, Admiring...

We Even Spotted A Most Unusual Bike Rack, My Friend Linda Will...

We Had Waited For Sunday To Head Into Central Lima, Thinking The...

We Stopped To See A Greek-Style Statue With A Llama Sitting On...

And Then We Headed To A Former Bank That Has Been Converted...

The Main Floor Has Been Completely Restored And The Original Teller Cages...

Old Spanish Coins And Bills Are On Display Inside The Cages, What...

I Got A Kick Out Of This Note, I Don't Think I've...

Back Out On The Streets Of The Colonial Centre, We Admired The...

We Heard A Bank Playing And Were Delighted To Find The Changing...

Another First, A Mounted Band Playing Their Instruments As They Rode In...

The Crowds Were All Using Umbrellas To Shelter From The Sun, It...

The Buildings Lining The Plaza Were Beautiful, And What An Incredible Colour,...

Yet Another Surprise - A Peruvian Food Fair Was Underway, Regional Food...

Everything Was Beautifully Displayed, And Great Effort Was Being Made To Keep...

We Were Able To See A Popular Peruvian Dish, Sliced Beef Heart...

It Looked Much Better Than I Had Imagined It After Reading About...

After Finding Some Foods More To Our Liking, We Walked Along The...

We Couldn't Understand The Sign Completely, But It Seems They Want To...

As We Headed Back Towards The Square, We Heard Music Once Again,...

One Man Was Carrying The Most Incredible Stringed Instrument I've Ever Seen

The Band Was Followed By Costumed Dancers Wearing Masks On Their Faces

Many Andean Dancers Still Use Masks As Part Of The Dancer's Costumes

The Masks Can Represent Demons, Angels, Spaniards And All Sorts Of Animals

In This Case, The Most Of The Dancers Seemed To Represent Spaniards...

The Fabrics Were Shiny, Covered With Embroidery And Festooned With Lace

The Women's Costumes Were Elaborate, But So Were The Men's

The Men Seemed To All Have Facial Hair On Their Masks And...

There Was One Dance Troupe After Another, All Bands Playing The Same...

This Dancer Seemed To Represent The Indigenous Peoples Rather Than The Foreign...

And Yet Another Dancer Must Be A Farmer As He Was Dressed...

In The End, We Concluded That This Must Be A Display Or...


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BACKGROUND

Excerpts from the Lonely Planet – Peru:

Lima has survived endless cycles of destruction and rebirth. Regular apocalyptic earthquakes, warfare and the rise and fall of civilizations have resulted in a city that is as ancient as it is new. When Francisco Pizarro sketched out the boundaries of his ‘City of Kings’ in January of 1535, there were roughly 200,000 indigenous people living in the area.

By the 18th century, the Spaniards’ tumbledown village of adobe and wood had given way to a vice regal capital, where fleets of ships arrived to transport the conquest’s golden spoils back to Europe. In 1746, a disastrous earthquake wiped out much of the city, but the rebuilding was rapid and streets were soon lined with baroque churches and ample casonas (mansions). The city’s importance began to fade after independence in 1821, when other urban centers were crowned capitals of newly independent states.

By the mid-1900s the number of inhabitants began to grow exponentially. An influx of rural poor took the metro area population from 661,000 in 1940 to 8.5 million by 2007. The migration was particularly intense during the 1980s, when the conflict between the military and assorted guerilla groups in the Andes sent victims of the violence flocking to the capital.

Shantytowns mushroomed, crime soared and the city fell into a period of steep decay. In 1992, the terrorist group Sendero Luminoso (Shining Path) detonated deadly truck bombs in middle-class Miraflores, marking one of Lima’s darkest hours.

But the city has again dusted itself off and rebuilt – to an astonishing degree. A robust economy and a vast array of municipal improvement efforts have led to repaved streets, refurbished parks, and cleaner and safer public areas, not to mention a thriving cultural and culinary life.

Planted on the sandy foothills of the Andes, Lima is a rambling metropolis composed of more than 30 municipalities or districts. The city’s historic heart, Lima Centro, lies at a bend on the southern banks of the Río Rímac. Here, around the Plaza de Armas, a grid of crowded streets laid out in the days of Pizarro houses most of the city’s surviving colonial architecture.

From this point, Av Arequipa, one of the city’s principal thoroughfares, plunges southeast … towards well-to-do San Isidro. This is Lima’s banking center and one of its most affluent settlements. San Isidro quickly gives way to the contiguous, seaside neighbourhood of Miraflores, which serves as Lima’s contemporary core, bustling with commerce, restaurants and nightlife.

Immediately to the south lies Barranco, a stately turn-of-the-20th-century resort community. Long the city’s bohemian center, today it boasts some of the most hopping bars in the city. A tony resort back at the turn of the 20th century, Barranco is lined with grand old casonas, many of which have been turned into hotels and eateries. A block west of the main plaza, look for the Puente de los Suspiros (Bridge of Sighs), a narrow, wooden bridge over an old stone stairway that leads to the beach. The bridge – which is especially popular with young couples on first dates - has inspired many a Peruvian folk song.

KAPOORS ON THE ROAD

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