Alpert-Shroyer 2010 Bonus World Cruise travel blog

Ominous, foretelling sunrise in the Lombok sky, hinting at what was in...

 

Low tide for this Island home with its required form of transportation...

 

Construction accomplished by numbers of workers on Mosques & shrines in Lombok

Roof ridge & end caps for sale in a stall beside the...

Water Park one of the King's built for the public use &...

Gate to the Platform in the middle of the Water Park

Ornate carvings added to posts of side buildings in the Water Park

 

More gates leading to a shrine or temple we visited

Ellie enjoying the air conditioning & Debbie, doing what she normally does:...

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Elder scraping a coconut with a piece of glass in the Hindu...

steps leading to an upper level of the Hindu temple from another...

Gates to the Hindu temple

Mosque spires dot the skyline in the land of 1000 temples

Market fruits, vegetables, spices & grains for sale in the "traditional" market

Grains and seeds available for purchase in this market as well

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

compared to this morning's picture, the tide can't rise much more to...

Begging by children (& adults) become a pattern of life when a...

Aquatic fish & pearl farming by dedicated attendants who live above the...

Ferries shuttle peopel & goods between Indonesian Islands

Two scoops and a slice of pecan pie for me, please.


Oh, the humidity (or the humanity suffering from it)! If the heat & humidity were not enough on Komodo to kill a person & only good for Dragons, then they followed us to Lombok like ugly twin sisters of fate. We found out our "twin sisters" would be following us for many a day until we get north of Manila, Philippines or at least until we get to Shanghai, China (then the smog & pollution will be accompanying the other "twin sisters").

Our early morning sunrise to Lombok was omen to what we should have known what the day was to be like-HOT! We got an early start for our 08:15 tour of ancient temples & its market places of Lombok. Since, the harbor is shallow for cruise ships, we endured a 20 min. tender ride to the dockside where we got on to our waiting buses for a long day of "touring." We saw many temples and all the "humanity" on the way and in between. Lombok is a very undeveloped, agrarian island. They have learned the ways of small business & "hustling" tourists. Their tourism business has only be started since the early 80's, so they are learning from Viet Nam, China & other nations that the poor & less educated have to earn a living to eat & pay their bills: the street vendor or hustler. At each temple or "Royal Palace," the "hustlers" on their scooters, would follow us around showing their wares, calling out "What you want to pay, mister;" when you rejected their high price offer. Negotiating is expected & you are thought of very little if you pay full price or even their 1st "lowered" price. They expect you to get to your lowest price & will wait you out to see what (or if you will) give for what they are selling.

After riding about 45 min., our tour stopped at a park, built by one of their kings as a water park for animals & people. It had ceremonial platforms in the middle of a lake & other structures for various activities centered around their religion. Islam is the predominant religion of Lombok, but their is Hindu & Christianity as well. This Island is know as the "land of a thousand temples." Our guide informed us this could not be true because in each household there is many temples inside the family temple each time some is married & lives in the family house or compound. There is a distinct difference in the areas of Muslim communities, Hindu Communities & Christian compounds. The predominance of the country is dirty & polluted, with trash everywhere (including the waters). In areas where there is a concentrated effort to improve & take pride of one's life & history, the area was kept somewhat clean of trash, debris & practiced clean water standards. These areas were mostly the Mosques, Hindu communities & temples & the Christian compounds. There is little or no refrigeration, air conditioning and very little electricity to run what we deem "modern conveniences." Oil is cheap in Indonesia, so gasoline is plentiful & everyone has a scooter, small car or Mini SUV.

The next stop was at a Royal Palace of a King in the 1800's whose family had been in power about 100 yrs & was so revered that only their buildings could be built with a special "red" brick developed at that time. Of course, our "mobile vendors" followed us to the Palace but stopped short of entering the Palace with the uniformed guards present. We stayed only 30-45 min and contended with again, the "mobile" vendors outside the Palace gates.

We were getting to the point of exhaustion from all the touring & pestering of the vendors, mobile & stationary and were glad to hear our last stop was the traditional market in a town center. This was about another 30 min. away & the guide kindly stopped at a gas station for us to go to the bathroom (there were no luxury hotels or resorts for us to stop & visit). Some ladies got off & a lot of the men did. The ladies got a surprise when they went into the restroom: the toilet was in the "French" style! By this I mean a ceramic hole in the floor with no flushing facilities & only a bucket of water with a cup to wash with. Many of the more "refined" would get back on the bus & hold it. Those who absolutely had to go, did the best they could & fore warned the others what to expect.

Our last stop, the "traditional market" was something to be amazed about. There were every fresh fruit, grain, vegetable, meat or fish to be sold there, including the hardware to cut, plate, store or season what was to be cooked or eaten that was sold here. It was a dirty place, with old foods simply thrown on the floor to be walked on & cleaned up at some time when it was more convenient to deal with. There is no refrigeration, so all meats & fish were in the "coolest" part of the building & there was water available to wash all the "unmentionables" away (that little or none-all parts of an animal are used or sold). All the tour buses stopped here at one time & the "traditional market" turned into a tourist gawking, photo snapping event. Thank goodness the stop didn't last very long because it was a welcomed site when we finally pulled up to the port to transfer back to our tender & the sweltering 20-25 min ride back to the cool, air conditioned ship, with cold refreshments & wholesome food (safe to eat) awaited us. We all felt fortunate about being here & seeing this part of the world & its own kind of beauty. You certainly can't get education like that from any magazine or book & it surely isn't taught in ANY of the schools ANYWHERE!

"Our World, Our Way, No Regrets!"



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