Just Relax travel blog

Leaving Rimouski @ 0430. Got to aee a great sunrise - bortunately...

Typical fog. We use our radar, and we are learning how to...

Largest windmill in N.A.? Lots of windmills here.

In St. Anne, a local carves driftwood and places them around town

Grande Vallee wharf at about mid-tide.

This is it - only about 3 stores here and us two...

Grande Vallee - the longest covered bridge in Canada we are told.

It is fun watching these birds fish. We see them with little...

Tallest lighthouse in Canada, near the end of the Gaspe Pennsula. We...

Beginning of the Appalachian mtns. This little rock is only about 5...

Someone sent us an email asking for a pciture of a seal....


We leave Rimouski on July 13 after a nice visit there. Learning to communicate in French more is becoming easier. Even though generally we can find someone who speaks English, it is part of the fun to do our best to communicate in French, or at least make the attempt. The folks here aer quite nice and appreciate the effort. From time to tome, we are not able to find someone who speaks English, so via hand signals, using simple words in both languages, we manage to get by quite fine, and enjoy it at the same time. The run to St. Anne-Des-Monts was nearly 13 hrs. WE had not planned on such a long day, but the planned stop, was just that, a place to stop for the night, but since the winds were kind to us, we decided to keep on going, taking also advantage of the long daylight. We pass many windmills, including, if we understand it correctly, the largest in North America (Canada?). We continue to see much wildlife, which Sue loves. This is one of the main reasons she was looking forward to this trip - seeing critters. There were a lot of weeds in the water, and John was driving and noticed the boat was not running right - slow for the RPM we were doing. He radioed HC and inquired about their speed, and decided to stop, put the boat i reverse and see if that was the problem. When he did, out the rear came a bunch of weeds that had got stuck in the prop, and right afterwards, our speed increased to normal. Fortunately the weeds did not get into our engine strainers.

Since we had such a long day,Sue brought out the Scrabble game and set it up on the flybridge table. we took turns driving and playing - and as usual Sue wins. We have been traveling several days now on the eastern part of the St. Lawrence and everything people told us to expect, we have. Mainly, how lonely it is up here. We pass no boats for the entire day today (13 hrs) for example, except off in the distance we see an occasional ship on the horizon, or in the ship channel many miles away. Late in the day, here comes the fog, rain and some waves. Sue gets nervous, which in turn makes John nervous, since he does not like it when his darling is not happy. It is cold also today, so we drive from inside some to warm up running the heat.

St. Anne is a quaint town that we enjoy seeing. Even though we arrive late in the day, there is planty of time to see some sights, and getting off the boat for a walk was a nice release. We are now at the most northern part of our trip - N49 13.9/W065 08. We have much more east to go, however.

July 13 brings us from St. Anne to Grande Vallee where we had planned on anchoring in a cove we heard about. We dropped anchor just fine (with our new system) in much wind. We thought we'd be pretty protected, and normally would, but the wind was blowing in the strong direction, blowing the boat all around, rocking and rolling. so Sue said, this is no good. There is a public wharf a few yards away where fishing boats tie to, so we weighed anchor and went over to check it out. We tie to a ladder temporarily and John climbs it to finish tying us off. The wall is 16' high at low tide, so we put out fender boards and plenty of fenders and extra lines to compensate. The winds are not bothering us too much, but we do squeak some from the fenders rubbing against the wall. HC decides to do the same, but when they weighed their anchor, their windlass dies. Later on, when they get it taken off at Gaspe, the motor shop there tells them it is not fixable. So Doug is busy trying to find a replacement motor for it, here in territory that is not easy to get things like this done. It rained hard ALL day along with waves rolling us all day. Even though it was only a 7 hr day, we are beat. Doug and John walk thru the town, pick some wildflowers to help cheer up the girls, while the girls stay on the boat, resting. Also, we are soaked from the rain, so we dry off and run the generator to warm up - YUK! A little wine and Suduko's with a thankful prayer were in order tonight after a great meal of Sues famous hamburgers and Doug's crock pot beans. During the stay at the wall, the rain poured so hard, that the downspouts at the wharf started filling the boat with water. they were situated such that they dumped right into the aft. So, John gets back out, getting soaked again, and plugs the downspouts with our rains suits. It worked - LOL. But the bilge is now with much water, so John the net day has to bail it out in the low spots where the bilge pump does not get to.

We leave at a decent hour the next day (0645) for Gaspe. Again, we decide to bypass our next stop, because in spite of the forecast - high winds from the west, with small craft warnings - we decide that if we hug the shore, we will make our next stop of only 40 miles. As it turns out, today is the best day we have had weather-wise since leaving MOntreal. So we decide to make Gaspe, another 9+ hrs. We see not only more whales, seals,,, but we aer getting into bird country, and there are so many different species. They are nesting in the cliffs, and we wear out the binoculars looking at them. The Appalachian mountains begin here. We will make a separate entry for Gaspe since we are staying here for 3 nights being tourists, renting a car. Gaspe is up a bay (Baie) about 20 miles from the ocean - yes, we are off the river now. A beautiful run, again with us rubbernecking all the way to the nice marina. The marina has us tied up to the fuel dock, since we are too big for the slips.



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