Clem and Pam's Australia and Papua New Guinea Diving Adventure 2007 travel blog

Loading the boat in PNG, Pam does the porter's work

Gearing up for a night dive. Amazing creatures come out after dark.

The "Spirit of Niugini", our dive boat. An excellent place to be.

Clem discusses boats with one of the PNG locals.

Pam and Clem thank the kids for a singsing they gave us.

Pam "holding court" with the children. They love her.

Pam gabbing it up after a great day of 4 dives.

Clem checking out the skulls of the guys who lost the fight,...

Nemo again. These guys are really cool. Taking their photo is tough,...

One of the dozens of lionfish we saw. A serious predator and...

When they say "giant clam" they mean GIANT!

The sea slugs are magnificent, if hard to see. This little guy...

This white-tip shark got annoyed with Clem's picture-taking intrusion and high-tailed it...

Here's Pam over a typical reef we dove. More going on than...

Ever been in a stiff current? Pam has! Many of our dives...

Another typical reef scene. How many different sea creatures do you see?

Another view of too many kinds of creatures to count.

A cuddly cuttlefish we hung out with at about 82 feet. Watching...

My favorite reef photo. Pam worked hard to get this trigger to...


Dive crazy! We have been diving like crazy ever since we got here. We are now deep in the 50's, and taking classes to get our "Master Diver" status. Even so, we still feel like we are just learning about diving and the sea. There is so much to know and do and see here that we are dazzled all the time.

The dive resort here has internet, but no phone or TV or other media. (Woo hoo!) Now that it's the dry season it only rains here once a day, in the afternoon. They told us that they get six meters of rain a year here, around ten times what we get in Chattanooga.

Today we are drying out. We took a trip to see the local "skull caves" and a village. The locals keep the skulls of their enemies in a nearby cave, from a time past when they would fight each other during times of famine. Though they are only about 100 years old, some of them are already encrusted with calcite. It was a fascinating place.



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