OUR LIFE ON WHEELS - Vol. III travel blog

Timber Valley is one of our SKP Parks; we can stay for...

A typical Timber Valley "street" in view of wooded hills.

Looking the other direction is just as nice.

The Horse Creek Bridge at Myrtle Creek, OR, formerly stood over the...

This building, next to the Horse Creek Bridge, is called the "Skate...

A sign on the door of the Skate Church says it was...

Suzy is playing Toll Booth at the Neal Lane Bridge, at 42...

The Neal Lane Bridge is the only one in Oregon featuring this...

The Neal lane bridge was built in 1939 for only $1000. With...

Is Suzy playing Toll Booth again? This time at the Cavitt Creek...

This is the Cavitt Creek Bridge. With that clearance, the motorhome would...

The unusual portal shape allowed log trucks with their high loads to...

I've got to get into a picture now and then.

This Canada goose family had a safe, sheltered place to live near...

I went down to take a picture up, and Suzy stayed up,...

This sign tells that the Little River and the North Umpqua River...

One year in the spring, the No. Umpqua River actually pushed the...

The confluence of the Colliding Rivers has created a delightful swimming hole...

The Rochester Bridge, just outside of Sutherlin, like most Oregon covered bridges,...

The Rochester Bridge, built in 1933, has gracefully arched windows as a...

The arched window gives a lovely view of the river below.

The Grave Creek Bridge is several miles south, near a museum explaining...

16-year-old Martha Crowley died from typhus in 1896, after nursing others to...

Someday we'll drive across that bridge and up the road to ......

These are the cattle at the Hat Creek Hereford Ranch and RV...

The RV Park here has some full hookups, some partial, and several...

Mount Shasta from the highway just north of Hat Creek, CA.

Mount Lassen looms large over the landscape.

Mt. Lassen again, with some local flora for perspective.

We found a great vista point where we could get a view...

...... and Mount Shasta! Two great volcanoes for the price of one!

Suzy and Mount Lassen -- two classic beauties.

"The Rest of the Story!" A fabulous rest stop along a back...


June 1, time to move on. We paid our electric bill at Pheasant Ridge RV Park (nearly $90 for the 30-day stay, bringing our total costs to just over $16 a day for space, electricity, water, sewer, propane, and an indoor swimming pool - not too bad!).

Heading south on I-5 we turned inland just below Salem to reach the town of Jefferson, OR, to see our new "hometown." We are changing our mail forwarding service from UPS in Lake Oswego to a privately owned company in Jefferson, which will save us some dollars. We wanted to see this population-3000 metropolis, to at least say, yes, we've been to Jefferson. It's a little rural community far enough from I-5 to be quiet, close enough for easy access.

As we moved further south on I-5, our souls were fed by the all-embracing green: fields, shrubs, trees, mountains, each a different shade of green. Suzy seldom waxes poetic, but she commented, "Oregon is soft on the eyes."

At Sutherlin we spent three nights in an SKP (Escapee) Park similar to the one in Benson (except Benson is in the desert, of course). From there we did a little sightseeing. Oregonians love their covered bridges, and we found four within a day's driving tour:

Horse Creek Bridge and Neal Lane Bridge are both in the town of Myrtle Creek; Cavitt Creek Bridge is east of Roseburg, near the town of Glide; and the Rochester Bridge is just a couple of miles west of Sutherlin.

Tooling down I-5 toward California, we saw the Grave Creek Bridge at Sunny Valley. Grave Creek is so named for the little grave dug many years ago for a 16-year-old girl who died of typhus upon reaching this point on the Applegate Trail (an alternate to the Oregon Trail). What makes this grave particularly sad is that this girl had nursed back to health many of the pioneers she accompanied along the trail, then died of the same disease as she approached her destination.

Oregon has 51 covered bridges, and we have now seen twelve. We'd love to see all the others, but then we have the rest of the country to visit as well.

As we crossed the California / Oregon state line, we immediately collected rain, after all the hot days in Oregon. Somehow that seems backwards. Approaching Mount Shasta we found that elegant lady hiding behind a full-length gown of gossamer cloud. The vista point just north of Weed had no vista at all! But as we neared the town of Mt. Shasta, the lady modestly began to lift the hem of her garment, so we saw a little snow on what might be considered her "ankles."

We spent one night in Yreka, CA, at a park that was new to us. We ordinarily don't like "one night stands," but our plan is to get to Nevada fairly quickly, not spending too many dollars on commercial parks, which is about all there is between our starting and stopping points. Our next destination was Hat Creek, CA at a park called the Hat Creek Hereford Ranch. This is an actual cattle ranch, and we found the animals munching happily in a lush meadow beyond the trees.

Only as we were leaving the Hat Creek area did we get a chance to photograph Mount Shasta, shining in the sun. Turning the other direction we had some great views of Mount Lassen as well. Two snow-covered volcanoes for the price of one! It's hard to remember sometimes that these are volcanoes, until you drive the back highways past the lava and basalt remains of the old eruptions. Other than Mount St. Helens in Washington, Lassen is the latest of the American volcanoes to blow her stack (May 19, 1915).

Bordertown, Nevada will be our next stop along ... Our Life on Wheels.



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