Two months in Mexico travel blog

As I was walking to the Comalcalco site I found this cute...

Comalcalco north temple. Right down the entrance path. Wow, it is huge

under a protective roof is the remains of stucco scuptures at the...

moving along the base of the temple, are remains of legs and...

last of scupted figures on north temple. remember this are over 2000...

sitting on a small mound in the middle of the plaza, this...

turning to the left this is the left side of the north...

north temple on right side. too big for one shot. Roof covers...

continuing swinging the view to my left, this is the temple III...

next to temple III is I and II, in background is acroplis...

this is temple number I. Not much left to this temple. Acroplis...

The sign gives a birds eye view of what the north temple...

view of north temple plaza standing by sign. I sat on the...

temple on top of hill from north plaza group. Roofs cover remants...

zoom of frescos on side of temple

imaga of sun god fresco under the protective roof

under roof, remains of fresco sculpted carvings in stucco plaster covering pyramid

more of the carving in the stucco facade under the roof

up the hill from the roofed frescos temple (would be on right)...

This pyramid site is the only one built of small flat bricks....

inside recesed doorway is the stucco facade with carved figures

panning view to the right gives more figures around the corner of...

the bottom tier of the acroplis temple.

after climbing to the top of the acroplis area. Remains of vaulted...

view of acroplis from the very top of hillside, which would be...

walking down a little, vaulted wall is tallest on left. North temple...

turning around from the acroplis is the view of the tabasco plain...

down inside the acroplis area in the vaulted wall hallway

only window in the walls I found

square columns on outide of acroplis building. Held a patio roof

vaulted wall looking from columns

building next to acroplis shows vaulted door hallway with corbeled roof. couldn't...

trees crowded the edge of the pyramid site These are gauvas, the...

path trough the trees on way out of pyramid site. Thick and...

flower hanging from tree in the parking area of Comalcalco site by...


The ancient site of Comalcalco:

Comalcalco was set in the lush jungle foliage just beyond the dusty town of the same name. Seems strange the rest of the town was beat to death by traffic, cement and human feet and just down a long drive was this wonderful setting with huge pyramids nestled in mowed green grass surrounded by thick jungle trees.

I took a combi taxi to the site from Villahermosa. It was about an hour away from town. We passed many plots of land planted with bananas, oranges, cocoa beans, guavas and stands of bamboo. Rural houses had yards filled with chickens, goats and other meadows had Brahma cows. The rural area was very refreshing compared to the city. It was green and lots of trees lined both sides of the road. The combi taxi buzzed right along and passed anything that was going slower that it. Which was everything. He would honk and pass even if the oncoming traffic was close. I had to ignore it and he handled the driving just fine without me. The combi dropped me off at the center of town. I set the place to memory as I had to get back there then I was done visiting the site. I walked almost 2 miles before a city bus came by. I caught it and in two blocks the bus dropped me off at the entrance of the road that went to the site. I had another mile to walk to the site. Along each side of the road were residences. Some were ok, some were junky, and some were very fancy. Found the unfinished one in the picture. Thought of you, Linda, and wondered what it would take to finish it, what it would cost, and what I would do if I lived there. Nothing. So, scratch that idea. The site had a small museum, no pictures, of course. The buildings at the site were all built from molded flat bricks mortared together. The only one that has been found so far like it. It is Mayan in origin although built so close to the ocean in the Olmec territory. The pictures speak for themselves so I won't add anything else here.

I took the small bus back to town from the park, didn't have to walk that time. The taxi stand that was located in the center of town was for local taxis. I couldn't find the combi taxi stand to Villahermosa and had to take a regular one back which cost me 35.00 American. Bummer. I did however manage to have a fairly decent conversation with the driver between, no Spanish/no English between us. Only sparse words and lots of hand signals. He was very nice and got a kick out of each time I saw chickens. I would point and tell him 'galina' and he would laugh. He drove me to the hotel in real good time. It was a nice exchange of cultures, but it still cost me 35.00.

The next day I was trying to get directions about what combi bus went to the bus station on the corner of the small plaza next to the hotel when a lady came up and helped me translate to the man in charge of the combis. When I found out what I wanted I walked up the street of the historical district. The lady followed me and stopped me. She said she was an English teacher that taught English to some students and was looking for someone to come to her class and help them practice their English by asking questions about America. I was really surprised. But thinking about it, the Universe was telling me this was a wonderful opportunity to connect with people in Mexico. I told her I was leaving in the morning, but if she could pick me up and bring me back to the hotel I would have time before my bus left. She said that would be great and the deal was made. I then continued with my mission of the day and walked up to the ADO bus station and bought my ticket for Campeche. I walked back to the hotel. The town was interesting. The streets were wider and the houses freshly plastered and painted. As I walked by some windows I could see into the interiors. The rooms were tiled and the furnishings sparse with mostly hard back wooden chairs, an occasional rocker, but never any stuffed couches. They were all very clean and tidy. There were tables, but I didn't see many TV's. The afternoon was hot and I was ready for the hotel after a long 10-block walk.

After I took a nap and watched a couple of movies, (my day off Linda) I got back into the groove again. I figured that may be my only hotel on the trip with a TV, I would take the opportunity. Besides a couple movie channels were in English. Toward evening I went back out and found a fast food place, Mc Donald's and bought a hamburger and fries. At least they didn't put hot sauce on it like the Burger King did the night before. I found a tee shirt in the crowded street and called it a night leaving the crowd of people to push and shove on the sidewalks. Not my cup to tea. A crowd is not my thing, nor is a lot of noise. It was pretty noisy the whole time I was there, but it was the downtown area. No choice in where the hotels are. At least the cobblestone streets were clean, as they had a whole crew of street cleaners busy cleaning up after everyone. Only saw a couple of beggars and not the type of street vendors that were in Mexico City. These had little carts and were set up on the sidewalk. I also delighted in the homemade Popsicles made from fresh fruit, and every time I saw one I just had to buy one to eat as I was walking around.

The next a. m. the lady met me as arranged and took me to her school. It was a type of leisure learning school that offered classes according to the time the students could take them around their work schedules. There were two students, one man, an accountant and a lady 26 that worked for a petroleum company (Universal Compression) with their home office in Houston. They were wonderful. Had many things to ask and I explained the differences I observed between Mexico and the U.S. After the class was over she took me back to the hotel and I caught my bus to Campeche. More later. Love, Gay



Advertisement
OperationEyesight.com
Entry Rating:     Why ratings?
Please Rate:  
Thank you for voting!
Share |