Two months in Mexico travel blog

0ld man assembling his hand made broom with some sort of tree...

tying the broom with a yellow cord to hold the branch on...

Olmeca heads, have to be at least 8 or 9 feet high....

same head, different angle

man sitting inside cave opening. Signifies coming from the womb of the...

meso american cultures compared in order of being through a time line...

one of the three crouching figure culptures found at San Lorenzo. Opps,...

areas in Mexico that the Olemec culture spread out and touched. They...

serpent head, rain god Taloc you can see his pointed tooth and...

funeral urn. Has sculpted head for lid. Don´t ask how they got...

This one is a xipe-toltec, wearing a flayed skin. Statue has four...

possibly a running deer. Great sculpture carving

head on left is serpent other two animals. If it weren´t for...

hard to make out but this is a stele with mayan looking...

this is a great urn or braizer. Figure is so clean cut...

clay figures, hollow inside. That is not a flash bulb you see,...

finest clay sculpture. Twin figures holding box. Darn, that flash again, got...

volcanic stone, as in most of these scuptures of turtle. Symbol of...

seated figure missing his head. Bummer.

museum grounds. Most of flower beds are in the shadow. Very pretty

each one of these heads have a different expression, maybe different kings...

ceramic art exhibit under the plaza in a small art gallery.

It´s wonderful the way the artist pushed and pulled the clay in...

such intercourse of line and form

the structures of shape are wonderful, wonder if he makes a living...

steps to church on left. on right are arches, but got lost...

side street going up the hill from the church. One lane traffic...

door to church. That was all that would fit in the camera...

one of the main streets, one way traffic. Streets branch off at...

crouch of street branch have triangle shape buildings. hostel is on right...


Jalapa Museum: Nov 19

It is Friday a.m. and I am going to the great Archaelogical museum here in Jalapa. I rode the city bus up the hill to the top. The museum had beautiful grounds anda huge building. The whole thing was built out of marble tile. The exhibits were placed in spacious rooms where they were easy to see. Most of them were behind glass. I wasn't supposed to use a flash, but I couldn't turn off the camera and misjudged the light a couple of times and it went off. A little old man sitting on a bench jumped up and waved his arms, saying 'no flash, no flash'. He didn't take my camera, but watched me for a while after that. I wanted to take pictures of everything as they had some wonderful Olmec statues. I settled for a book, the last one for sale in English being I couldn't use a flash in the rooms.

I drooled over the ceramic bowls and figures. Some were quite large. They had to make the pottery in pieces and fire them, then assemble them. They were held together with some sort of mortar to glue them together. I received the impression that the Olmec may have been sea faring enough to influence the Samona people from the South Pacific. If they settled in Hawaii that would account for some of the features in art and carvings I saw when I lived in Hawaii, which were very similar to what was here. As I made my way through the museum I took pictures of the exhibits in the open patios and anything else I could get away with. They had funeral jars and braziers with carved faces. They had many of the heads from the La Venta Site in Tabasco. Jar after jar and figure after figure was very nicely displayed. I went outside and had my lunch of the two sandwiches I made the night before on the garden grounds. I encountered an old man with a hand made broom sweeping the sidewalk and a young gardener with an ancient hoe working the flowerbed. It was pleasant to sit in the shade. The grounds were like a park, clean and well groomed.

I saved the bread for the pigeons I saw in the town plaza and when I returned I sat and fed them. When I was finished with lunch I wandered back through the museum again, trying to absorb as much as possible to memory to use when I start my session of working with clay when I returned home. I took the bus back to downtown. When I was dropped off further down the street I found a shop that put my pictures on disk. I fed the pigeons in the park. I had a whole flock of about fifty gathered around. They sure were hungry. I walked around a bit and took some pictures of the streets. I also found a ceramic art exhibit under the plaza and liked the way the artist manipulated the clay to make a series of pieces that fit together with such fluid movement.

The town sure was a quaint place, but I don't know what I would do if I lived there. As I was coming down the street I met a guy that helped me in one of the Internet cafes the day before. He was from New York. He spoke fluent Spanish so he helped me with translation. I was surprised when he spoke to me, but I recognized him when I turned around. We chatted for a few minutes. He has a girl friend from town and is returning to New York for 6 months to work then come back to Jalapa. He told me he was a stripper but I thought he was a pretty skinny guy to do that. I also asked him if the town had many 'gays' as I saw some posters in a store that suggested that. He told me that about four blocks down the street were many 'gay'bars and there were many in town. (Listen up, my friend this may be the place for you.) I spent the rest of the evening on the slow computer until it was time to take a taxi to the bus. I had to pay for the room for the day, but was glad to have a place for my bags even though I didn't spend the night. The hostel staff helped me load my bags into the taxi about 10.p.m. and I left for the bus station and the night ride to Villerhermosa. More later. Gay



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