The Thorne's Trip Around This Great Nation travel blog


Bright and early on October 12 (you know, like 10 AM) found us on the road again with the motorhome, headed for New Hampshire. Our route would take us away from Greenville Junciton, Maine to Hwy 2 and continue into NH to Gorham, where we would spend the next three nights.

It had rained our last night in Maine and continued dripping most of the way to the Timberland RV Park. But we were promised nice weather for several days starting the next day.

Our principal area of interest here was to be the White Mountains National Forest.

http://www.fs.fed.us/r9/forests/white_mountain/

There is so much to do and see in this area, it was hard to make up our minds what to do first. So, we decided to do a general tour of the area starting with the White Mountain Loop road. It was very beautiful with trees still in full colors, crystal blue skies and mountain tops everywhere you looked.

This area has a very very old running cog railway, so we took a ride out that way. My but that rail line goes straight up the back side of Mt. Washington and I mean straight. It was very cold and windy so we decided to watch the train leave and not take that ride. I did get some pictures before I froze and went back inside for a warm snack with Roger and Cora. After a look see at the nice but small museum and watching a film about the history of the rainway, we bought a few things to stimulate our memories later and returned to the loop road.

We spent most of the day riding around, enjoying the scenery and ooing and ahhing over the colors of the trees and the bushes.

Saturday, we took the Auto Road that goes up the opposite side of Mt. Washington from the railway. Talk about a steep road and narrow....Roger, who is an excellent driver, was white knuckled by the time we got to the top. There were places where the road was washing out from recent heavy rains and there was just inches between us and the cars coming the other way.

Mt. Washington is very famous for its high winds, and we experienced a little of that cold wind when we tried to walk to the top of the mountain via a stair way. It was just too cold and we turned back. We had only been outside a few minutes and we all ached from the cold. We found out later that with the wind chill the temperature, when we were there, was -4 degrees F. Now that is cold for us old folks, let me tell you.

We crept back down the hill and headed for Jackson, a town locally known for their October Pumpkin People. I took some pictures of the artistry and here is a link with past pictures of this event. http://www.jacksonnh.com/pumpkin.html

We found a beautiful set of homes along side a river rock area and enjoyed that view for awhile too.

Then we went to the local train museum and spent a couple of hours browsing in one of the largest miniature train museums we have seen. There are many working displays as well as hundreds upon hundreds of static display too. Roger and I had a hard time pullig ourselves away, but we three were hungry again and our feet were tired, so off we went to have a late lunch.

In the nearby town of Intervale, we found the Scarecrow Pub. I should mention that Roger and I really like pubs, and I thing we drug Cora to more pubs than she had ever been in before. We like the food and atmosphere of the traditional American type pubs. They are more family oriented in that they have a separate eating place away from the the noise of the bar, but they are still friendly and cozy, and mostly have really good home cooking. This one was no exception and we enjoyed ourselves as we chatted over our lunches.

Cora is a wonderful traveler, she enjoys seeing the sights, is not afraid to try something new and different and has a great sense of direction which got us out of a few tight spots as we tried to find our way to hard to locate towns or places.

Tomorrow (Oct 15th) we will move on again, headed to Vermont and Ben and Jerry's. LOL



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