Itchy Feet travel blog

These Dragons do quite a bit of lying around, usually looking for...

They kill water buffaloes by injecting bacteria with their bite and just...

Notice the female komodo protecting the din where she layed her eggs

Looking down into the mangrove forest at waters edge from a ridge...

Absorbing nutrients, with mouth wide open

Feather star hiding out

Feather stars actually move around looking for the best place to feed...

Puffer fish come in a variety of shape, sizes and color

Giant clams are easier to shoot as they don't move quite as...

All the marine life depend on their ability to extract nutirents from...

Lion Fish

Dog face puffer fish

No photoshop needed for this one

This is actually a Nudi Branck

Always eels hiding in the darndest places

These are shrimp (?) eels, they drop into the ocean floor as...

Pregnant white tip, about 6-7 ft.

Yet another puffer fish

One of more shallow swifter straits, manta rays will fly into the...

Movie Clips - Playback Requirements - Problems?

(MP4 - 1.21 MB)

Open wide

(MP4 - 4.04 MB)

Here she comes


Originally set up to protect the Komodo Dragon (world's largest monitor lizard) the park was extended to protect the surrounding marine environment. The land mass of all the islands represent only one third of the area of the Komodo National Park.

Lying between Sumbawa to the west and Flores, this place is a divers paradise. Location is everything for the Komodos; positioned between two contrasting bodies of water--the cold updwellings of the Indian Ocean and the warm water of the Flores Sea, just south of the South China Sea.

300-600 foot deep channels in the open sea areas contrast with the 90-200 foot deep straits that are relatively shallow. This creates swirling tides and fun to ride currents (also very dangerous) within the island group that in turn provide all the nutrients to support what many consider to be the most biologically divers marine life on the planet. Below is an interesting article on new species of shark and coral found just a little east of Komodos

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2006/09/060918-walking-shark.html



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