Larry & Lee Ann's Journey travel blog

Entering Tuzigoot territory...

Our first view as we arrived in the parking lot...

Here we are up close and personal...

Wow, few lived more than 40 years!

Larry taking a little break, he is doing well with his new...

The story of this place is very interesting...

Verde Valley Info...

Lake info...

It's actually quite beautiful...

Continuing on our trail...

Inside Living...

A peek inside...

Rooftop Living...

Yep, you could see for miles...

Trade Info, interesting...

Downhill used to be a big problem, not anymore!

In the museum there are neat pics, including this one of the...

The excavation has begun...

A part of the men who worked on the excavation...

One last shot of these interesting ruins, hope you enjoyed...


This morning we drove a few short miles to visit the Tuzigoot National Monument. Perched atop a ridge high above the Verde River, Tuzigoot is the remnants of one of the largest and best-preserved of the many Sinagua pueblo ruins in the Verde Valley.

Tuzigoot is Apache for "crooked water", for nearby Peck's lake, a cutoff meander of the Verde River.

The pueblo was built between 1100 and 1450 AD and consisted of two stories and 110 rooms. This structure, along with others whose ruins have been found in the surrounding area, provided shelter for hundreds of Sinagua occupants.

Tuzigoot is located on land once owned by United Verde and Phelps Dodge. The corporation sold the site to Yavapai County for $1, so that the excavation could be completed under the auspices of federal relief projects. The County in turn transferred the land to the Federal Government.

Tuzigoot was excavated from 1933 to 1935 by Louis Caywood and Edward Spicer of the University of Arizona, with funding from the federal Civil Works Administration and Works Project Administration. In 1935-1936, with additional federal funding, the ruins were prepared for public display.

We spent an hour and a half checking out the visitor center, a small, old-style museum with many artifacts. We understand it is one of the few museums interpreting ancient Sinaguan culture in Arizona. I especially enjoyed the old photos taken during this time period.

I have included several informational signs in todays post. We found them to be very interesting, so I won't bore you with any more details. One last point, there are two trails at Tuzigoot. The Ruins Loop trail and the Tavasci Marsh Overlook trail, both a quarter of a mile in length. The Ruins Lopp Trail loops around the pueblo and allowed us to closely view the structures. That made it so much more 'real'. For $5, one heck of a deal! We think this is a very worthwhile stop if you get into this area.

Before we got too worn out, we hustled back home to grab a bite to eat, shower and prepare for our 4 hour train ride this afternoon. Looking forward to that! See you there....



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