Larry & Lee Ann's Journey travel blog

Arriving at Tuzigoot...

There's a couple of folks on the top level, we'll be there...

Entering the museum we were greeted with this sign...

There is quite a difference in the locally made pottery as compared...

Unique chairs...

Plenty of work involved here...

A few more examples...

The touch screen in front of the display allowed for verbal interpretation...

I found these figurines interesting & unique...

The Crew...

Interesting mix of guys...

On our way to the ruins...

View to our left as we make our way up the trail...

A little info for you...

There is continuous repair on the soil between the stones...

Checking things out...

My honey is always taking care of business! LOL

Moving along, we've entered one of the few doorways at the ruins...

On top, looking out into the valley below...

Note the wide variety of colors & shapes used...

Love this pic!

Time to head back to the parking lot...

We encountered this unique rv on the way home...Pretty cool huh!

A closer look at the wood used...

Arriving back home...We had a great day, hope you enjoyed it too!


This morning we drove a few short miles to visit the Tuzigoot National Monument. Perched 120 feet atop a ridge high above the Verde River, Tuzigoot is the remnants of one of the largest and best-preserved of the many Sinagua pueblo ruins in the Verde Valley. The pueblo was built between 1000 and 1400 AD and consisted of two stories with 87 ground-floor rooms. This structure, along with others whose ruins have been found in the surrounding area, provided shelter for hundreds of Sinagua occupants. The name Tuzigoot is Apache for "crooked water" if you are wondering where on earth they came up with such a strange name. (Like I was, lol!)

Tuzigoot was excavated from 1933 to 1935 by Louis Caywood and Edward Spicer of the University of Arizona, with funding from the federal Civil Works Administration and Works Project Administration. In 1935-1936, with additional federal funding, the ruins were prepared for public display.

We started our trip checking out the visitor center, a small, old-style museum with many artifacts. We understand it is one of the few museums interpreting ancient Sinaguan culture in Arizona. I especially enjoyed the old photos taken during this time period. Several samples of local, as well as imported, pottery have been found here. They are displayed nicely, as are the numerous stone tools like axes, knives and hammers, as well as manos & metates for grinding corn. Other crafts included bone awls and needles, woven garments of cotton and ornaments of shell, turquoise and a local red stone (argillite) for personal wear. After our time in the Visitor Center we exited the building and began our tour of the ruins.

There are two trails, the Ruins Loop trail and the Tavasci Marsh Overlook trail, both a quarter of a mile in length. The Ruins Loop Trail loops around the pueblo and allowed us to closely view the structures. The weather was beautiful and we thoroughly enjoyed our walk.

The Entrance Fee is $5 or $8 for a combination entrance to both Tuzigoot & Montezuma Castle located nearby. We have the Golden Age Pass, so as you know, entrance to National Parks is free. We plan to see both Montezuma Castle and the Montezuma Well in the next week. We've been there in the past but it's been a few years. Both are a great place to get out and stretch your legs while pondering what it must have been like to live here when these walls & this area were home to a thriving Sinagua way of life. Enjoy!



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