ADVENTURES IN OUR AMERICAN DREAM travel blog

We are in Lolo, Montana

Info

Longhorns right at the entrance to the State Park...

Our first stop was the Visitors Center for info...

View

Jerry at the start of the trail..

Info

Info

The rest of the Info

Back on the trail..

Jerry

View

View

Lolo Creek, it is much more narrow than when Lewis & Clark...

Jerry and the cool bridge over Lolo Creek..

Lolo Creek

Another view..

Jerry talking to the awesome Ranger, he was full of information..

The path to the actual camping area..

The camping area..

Lolo Creek from the other side...

A huge fire ring...

Back inside..

View

View

View

View

View

View

View

There is a lot to see in this incredible museum..

Beautiful quilt..

View

Don't miss this one if you are in the area...

Back outside...

The leaves are changing with beautiful colors...

Last one!


We visited the Travelers' Rest State Park today in Lolo, Montana. We both love all the movies, documentaries etc. about Lewis & Clark and their awesome voyage to the Pacific. The Travelers' Rest State Park was named by Lewis and Clark when they stopped here to rest and hunt for deer etc. The park ranger said Lolo Creek was much wider at the time, he showed us right where the group camped. We also visited the incredible museum.

I am pasting info from the State Park with a bit of history about Lewis and Clark and the area. It is amazing to see they camped here in 1805 and then again on their return trip a year later, 1806. I can see why they loved this area. We have seen wild turkeys, deer and the ranger said there are also moose living by the creek. This area of Montana is absolutely stunning. We had planned to stay only a couple of days, there is so much to see and do we have extended our stay for a week. :-)

PASTE of HISTORY:

On September 9, 1805, Meriweather Lewis, William Clark and the Corps of Discovery followed their Shoshone guide, who they called Old Toby, along the course of today’s Bitterroot River to a campsite near the confluence of a stream flowing from snowy mountains to the west.

Here, at a crossroads of travel routes and center of commerce and culture for centuries, Old Toby instructed them to rest themselves and their horses and make preparations for the difficult mountain crossing ahead. The campsite was well used by the different Native American tribes crossing the mountains and traveling up and down the Bitterroot Valley, and for good reason. There was plenty of grass for horses and firewood, a clear mountain stream and ample game. The Corps of Discovery stopped along the stream, which Lewis named Travelers' Rest, and set up camp. For two days, they hunted and rested before departing this haven on September 11, 1805. They followed the creek westward along an ancient trail the Salish people call Naptnisa, (the road to the Nez Perce).

Nearly a year later, the party returned to Travelers’ Rest and camped at the same spot. From June 30 to July 3, 1806, the group rested and celebrated their last crossing of the tremendous Bitterroot Mountains. It was also here that the Captains finalized their bold separation plans, splitting the group in two to allow exploration of the Marias and Yellowstone Rivers on their return home.

Share |