Larry & Lee Ann's Journey travel blog

Arriving at the Well...

Hope you can read a bit of this...

This is the Well...Really an interesting place to visit

Cliff dwellings off to our left...

A little more info for you...

Time for a break!

Our buddies John & Joyce are here too...

There's a short path down to the irrigation 'ditch'...

On it's way to Beaver Creek...

This shot of John gives you a size perspective of the trees...

I think the Arizona Sycamore is very pretty...Don't you?


Continuing our day's journey we traveled 11 miles northeast of Montezuma Castle to visit the Montezuma Well, a natural limestone sinkhole through which some 1,400,000 US gallons of water flow each day through two underground springs. The well measures in at 368 feet across and 55 feet deep. The water is highly carbonated and contains high levels of arsenic. At least five endemic species live (only) in the Well: a diatom, a springtail, a water scorpion, the amphipod and the leech — the most endemic species in any spring in the Southwestern United States. It is also home to the Montezuma Well springsnail.

Along the path up top, there are plaques pointing out the native vegetation like mesquite and juniper trees, cacti, and scrub. As you hike down toward the water, you find a cave with the ceiling blackened by many a neolithic cooking fire. Plenty of graffiti dating back to the 1800s. After we got back to the main path, John & I took another side trail that lead us down to the outside of the cavern so we could photograph the water coming out the other side of the swallet and flowing thru an irrigation ditch to Beaver Creek. Montezuma Well's outflow has been used for irrigation since the 8th century. It is shady down there from the cliff walls and large sycamore tree and provided a nice break from the warm sun. Which actually wasn't all that bad today as it was in the low 70's.

The Yavapai people believe they emerged into this world through the well, and as such, it is a very sacred place to them. I can see why the site has served as an oasis for wildlife and people for thousands of years. I definitely enjoyed the short and easy walk around the well and I am sure you would too.



Advertisement
OperationEyesight.com
Entry Rating:     Why ratings?
Please Rate:  
Thank you for voting!
Share |