Back to my second home in Zhaoqing. travel blog

Yang Rui, the presenter of Dialogue, on CGTN.

Xu Qinduo, one of the panellists.

Gregory Yingnien Tsang, the other panellist.

Various shots from the coverage of the memorial event.

Various shots from the coverage of the memorial event.

Various shots from the coverage of the memorial event.

Various shots from the coverage of the memorial event.

Various shots from the coverage of the memorial event.

Various shots from the coverage of the memorial event.

Various shots from the coverage of the memorial event.

Various shots from the coverage of the memorial event.

Various shots from the coverage of the memorial event.

The next documentary.

Last Witness - one of only about 100 still surviving since 1937.


I turned on the TV this afternoon, on the 80th anniversary of the Japanese invasion and massacre in Nanjing, on December 13, 1937. Nanjing was then the capital of China, and over 300,000 were brutally murdered over a period of a few weeks.

I've been watching a Chinese channel, called China Global Television Network - CGTN. It presents - in English - a lot of great documentaries, mostly set in Asia, Africa and South America. It is amazing what you can learn though. And the programmes are very well made, and so educational.

Eighty years ago, the Japanese army invaded Nanjing, after spending some months bombing Shanghai. They also bombed Nanjing, before invading. It was a total bloodbath, by the historical records. People were randomly slaughtered, and women and girls raped and brutalized.

As a result of the impending invasion, the Chinese government uprooted, and set up in Chongqing, which is a long way inland. This did not entirely save them, but at least put some distance between them and the Japanese soldiers.

When it became obvious what was coming, many people tried to flee on foot, sometimes with just enough to survive on, and carrying babies and children, and supporting the elderly. Terrible times indeed.

The elderly lady in the last photo was five years old at the time. Her family could not all run, because her mother was due to give birth any day, and the elderly were too frail to escape. So she went, with her father and her maternal uncle who was around 15 years old at the time. They left the rest of the family in a silo they had dug under the ground, and covered up, to disguise it. After a few days of walking, they received a message that the rest of their family had been murdered, and the father had to make the awful decision of whether to keep running, or go back and take care of the bodies of his loved ones. They returned, and discovered a terrible sight in the silo, Dead bodies, and blood soaked into the soil.

Another elderly woman, who was 13 at the time, knelt on the ground in front of her father, who was holding her 2 year old baby brother, and begged the Japanese to spare him, but they stabbed him and slashed him up, and stomped the baby boy to death. The Mum who was heavily pregnant, gave birth early, and because they had no food, both her and the baby starved to death.

But the overwhelming message in all the programmes I have been watching on the TV, is not to be angry or carry resentment, rather to honour those who died, never forget, but to go forward in peace.



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