Kapoors Year 7: Europe/Ecuador/Peru travel blog

This Gate Tower Used To Be Part Of The Medieval Wall, Later...

However, It Was Through This 'Golden' Gate That Monarchs Would Make Their...

The Houses On Either Side Of Long Street Seem To Compete With...

We Made A Slight Detour To View The Elaborate Dutch Mannersim Façade...

Today It Houses The Academy Of Fine Arts

The Richly Adorned Front And Back Walls Inspire Admiration In All Who...

The Uphagen House On Long Street Once Belonged To An Eminent Councillor

It's A Mixture Of Rococo And Classicist Styles, Today It Is The...

We Continued Walking Along The Street, Admiring The Façades And Listening To...

Long Street Runs Into The Slightly Wider Market Street, Anil Spotted Mercury...

But It's Neptune That's Become The Symbol Of Gdañsk's Bond With The...

Legend Has It That The Neptune Fountain Once Spouted Goldwasser, Gdansk's Trademark...

The Fountain Was Fenced Off In 1634, Perhaps That's Why!

The 1618 Golden House Has The Most Elaborate Façade In The City

The Downspouts Of These Historical Cities Are Fascinating, This One Is Shaped...

The Buildings Are Well Cared For, Inside And Out

Halloween Is Fast Approaching, And Here And There We Spotted Carved Pumpkins

Thanks Goodness Our Guide Book Told Us This Was A Polish 'Milk...

Long Street Runs Into Market Street, It's A Little Wider And Allows...

The Town Hall Can Now Be Seen In All Its Glory, At...

Speaking Of Standing Back, I Turned Back To Admire The 'King's Way'...

The Green Gate Marks The River End Of The Royal Way, Lech...

What A Great View Of The Waterfront On A Sunny Autumn Day

You'll Notice That My Photos Alternate Between Cloudy And Sunny, We Made...

The Lack Of Sun And Slight Breeze Made Us Chilly So We...

Thank Goodness This Replica Ship Was Here The First Time, It Was...

The Parallel Streets Of The Old Town Each Had Their Own 'Brama'...

Mariacka Street Runs Between St. Mary's Gate And St. Mary's Church And...

Each Building Has Its Own Stone Terrace, Elaborately Decorated , CAn You...

Most Of The Former Residences Have Amber Jewellery Shops Out Front, Cafés...

If You Like Amber, You're Sure To Find Something To Suit Your...

The Maritime Museum Occupies These Buildings On The Waterfront, The Ship Is...

Along The Quay We Spotted Four Early Medieval Boundary Markers, Part Of...

They Looked Rather Ghostly, I Guess I Just Had The Upcoming Halloween...

The Most Dramatic Building Is The Gdansk Crane, Built In The 15th...

It Was Blasted To Smithereens In 1945, But Was Carefully Put Back...

What Makes It Unique Are The Four Large 5m Wooden Wheels Used...

We Were Delighted To Find That The Crane Museum Was Open, Often...

The Wheels Were Set In Motion By Men Walking Like Mice In...

And As The Rope Shortened, The Large Hook Attached To Heavy Loads...

The 1350 Great Mill, With 18 Massive Millstones, Produced 200 Tonnes Of...

This Lovely Mill House Across The Road Was Also Built By The...

WWII Started Here In Gdansk, This Monument To The Martyrdom Of The...

We Climbed To The Stronghold Fort To See The Millennium Cross, 2000...

Below Us We Could See The Infamous Gdansk Shipyards, Where The Road...

At The Base Of The Hill Stands The Most Unusual 'Cemetery Of...

The Monument Was Unveiled In 2002 To Commemorate Anonymous People Who Lived...

Thousands Were Buried In Unmarked Graves, Lost During Another Period Of Turmoil

Gdansk Was Repeatedly Destroyed, Rebuilt And Destroyed Again In The Course Of...

It Pays Respect To All Faiths And Nationalities, It Was Created Using...

As The Skies Darkened, We Hurried To The Nearby 'Roads To Freedom'...

The Museum Is Located In The Basement Of The Former Solidarity Headquarters

In The Fascinating Multimedia Display, We Were Able To Study The Turbulent...

The Struggle Against Communist Rule At The Lenin Shipyards Eventually Led To...

This Started A Domino Effect, Leading To The Fall Of The Berlin...

Leaders Like Lech Walesa Prevailed, Others Like Father Jerzy Popieluszko Perished

Back Outside In The Spitting Rain, We Hurriedly Viewed The Monument To...

It Was Unveiled On December 16, 1980, Ten Years After Of Massacre...

Back To The Waterfront Café For Dinner And More Mulled Wine, A...


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BACKGROUND

In the interest of expediency, here are some excerpts from the Lonely Planet - Poland chapter on Gdańsk:

Like a mini-state all to itself, Gdańsk has a unique feel that sets it aside from all other cities in Poland. Centuries of maritime ebb and flow as a port city; streets of distinctively un-Polish architecture influenced by a united nations of wealthy merchants who shaped the city’s past; the to-ing and fro-ing of Danzig/Gdańsk between Teutonic Prussia and Slavic Poland; and the destruction of WWII have bequeathed this grand old dame a special atmosphere millions now come to enjoy.

Describing Gdańsk’s past as ‘eventful’ would be a major understatement. The official history of the much fought-over city is counted from the year 997, when the Bohemian Bishop Adalbert arrived here from Gniezno and baptized the inhabitants. The settlement developed as a port over the following centuries, expanding northwards into what is today the Old Town. The German community then arrived from Lübeck in the early 13th century, the first in a succession of migrants that crafted the town’s cosmopolitan character.

In 1308 the Teutonic order seized Gdańsk and quickly turned it into a major trade centre, joining the Hanseatic League in 1361. In 1454 the locals decided on a spot of regime change, razing the Teutonic Knights’ castle, and pledging allegiance to the Polish monarch instead.

From here, the only way was up: by the mid-16th century, the successful trading city of 40,000 was Poland’s largest city, and the most important trading centre in Central Europe. Legions of international merchants joined the local German-Polish population, adding their own cultural influences to the city’s unique blend.

Gdańsk was one of the very few Polish cities to withstand the Swedish Deluge of the 1650s, but the devastation of the surrounding area weakened its position, and in 1793 Prussia annexed the shrinking city. Just 14 years later, however, the Prussians were ousted by the Napoleonic army and its Polish allies.

It turned out to be a brief interlude – in 1815 the Congress of Vienna gave Gdańsk back to Prussia, which became part of Germany later in the century. In the years that followed, the Polish minority was systematically Germanized, the city’s defenses were reinforced and there was gradual but steady economic and industrial growth.

After Germany’s defeat in WWI, the Treaty of Versailles granted the newly re- formed Polish nation the so-called Polish Corridor, providing the country with an outlet to the sea. Gdańsk itself was excluded and designated the Free City of Danzig, under the protection of the League of Nations. With the city having a German majority, however, the Polish population never had much political influence, and once Hitler came to power it was effectively a German port.

WWII started in Gdańsk when the German battleship Schleswig-Holstein fired the first shots on the Polish military post at Westerplatte. During the occupation of the city, Nazi Germany continued to use the local shipyards for building warships, with Poles as forced labour.

The Red Army arrived in March 1945; during the fierce battle that ensued the city centre virtually ceased to exist. The German residents fled, or died in the conflict. Their place was eventually taken by Polish newcomers, mainly from the territories lost to the Soviet Union in the east.

The complex reconstruction of the Main Town took over 20 years from 1949, though work on some interiors continued well into the 1990s. Nowhere else in Europe was such a large area of a historic city reconstructed from the ground up.

In December 1970 a huge workers’ strike broke out in the shipyard and was ‘pacified’ by authorities as soon as the workers left the gates, leaving 44 dead. This was the second important challenge to the communist regime after that in Poznań in 1956.

Gdańsk came to the fore again in 1980, when another popular protest paralyzed the shipyard. This time it culminated in negotiations with the government and the foundation of Solidarity. Lech Wałęsa, the electrician who led the strike and subsequent talks, later became the first freely elected president in postwar Poland.


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