Larry & Lee Ann's Journey travel blog

The Tyo's new trailer, very nice!

So nice to see them again!

On our way up the 'old' dam road...

We're ready for a great day!

We'll be right under the bridge we crossed in a sec...

The work in this bronze is amazing, such detail...

We just drove over the bridge...

Further up the dead end road for a wide look of the...

A look at the rope stopping the boaters as they approach the...

A closer look at the 4 Intake Towers, two in Arizona &...

As you can see, many folks pitch coins over the wall onto...

Unfortunately they also throw cigarette butts & trash over as well, bummer...

Joyce & I are having a good time!

John & Larry too!

Back on the dam, we took a little walk to check things...

I like this shot of the bridge...

And the dam, what an amazing feat!

Check out the turbulant waters below the dam...

4-5 years, amazing...

John, Joyce & I talking to the 'motorized' police, sure would love...

Looking up the river toward our campground...

Last shot for today, looking under the bridge to the pretty rock...


Friends John & Joyce arrived yesterday. Boy it was good to see them! We had a great time catching up & checking out their new Jayco Eagle trailer. Very nice & 7 feet longer than their previous rig. After chatting a bit we settled down with margaritas & chips before having tacos, rice & beans for dinner. We'd planned to play cards afterward, but after a long travel day & a late dinner, we decided to postpone for another day.

This afternoon we headed out for a day of exploring, mostly to view the Mike O’Callaghan – Pat Tillman Memorial Bridge (Colorado River Bridge) and of course to visit Hoover Dam. Construction on the nearly 2,000 foot long memorial bridge (with a 1,060 foot twin-rib concrete arch, the longest of any in North America) began in late January 2005 and traffic began using the Hoover Dam Bypass on October 19, 2010. This signature bridge spans the Black Canyon about 1,500 feet south of Hoover Dam connecting the Arizona and Nevada Approach highways nearly 900 feet above the Colorado River. More than 17,000 cars and trucks are using the new bridge daily.

One interesting note, during construction the proximity of the foundation excavation blasting to the historical Hoover Dam buildings and the desire to preserve the natural state of the canyon walls led to the installation of nets to catch loosened rocks and boulders. The project had its biggest setback on September 15, 2006 when all four of the 50-ton high line cable towers collapsed from the wind. The mishap delayed erection of the arch by nearly two years before a newly designed high line was built. The pier sections and pylons for the bridge were all built off site and trucked in while the arch rib sections were cast in 24 foot increments and were suspended over the canyon with cable stays until the two sides of the arch could be closed at the crown. The best design trait of all might well have been the simple decision to include a walkway on the north side of the bridge. From here, the majesty of the Hoover Dam can finally be seen straight on, from a vantage point normally reserved for planes or helicopters.

Named one of the Top 10 Construction Achievements of the 20th Century, Hoover Dam continues to attract more than a million visitors a year more than 70 years after its creation. Construction began on the dam in 1930, the largest of its kind at the time. Despite the remote location and harsh working conditions, it was completed in less than five years, two years ahead of schedule, and well under budget. If you'd like to know a whole lot more about the particulars of it you can read all you'd like here. It's really quite interesting!

Hoover Dam

If not, you might find it interesting to know that the dam was named after America's 31st president, Herbert Hoover, who played a large role in bringing the nearby states into agreement about water allocations, settling a 25-year controversy. The dam has been called Boulder Canyon Dam as well as Boulder Dam, but Hoover Dam was reinstated as the official name by Congress in 1947.

A National Historic Landmark, Hoover Dam is the highest concrete dam in the Western Hemisphere, standing at more than 725 feet above the Colorado River. With 17 generators producing 4 billion kilowatts of electricity a year, it also is one of the country's largest hydroelectric power facilities. Operation and maintenance of the facility are solely supported by revenue from power sales. And finally, the view from the dam also offers a breathtaking look at Lake Mead, the country's largest man-made reservoir. Although water levels have been low recently, Lake Mead can store up to 9.2 trillion gallons of water, equal to two years of the river's annual flow.

We continued our outing today by taking a turnoff above Lake Mead for a closer look and then decided to stop for a bite of lunch before a short tour of the pretty little community of Boulder City. But I'll save that part of our day for the next post. We took plenty of interesting pics & I don't want to overwhelm you by posting them all today. So please stop back by soon. Thanks, have a great day!



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