Here - There - Somewhere travel blog

Greece from Ferry

Faded Greece

Taverna Type

Piraeus Port


We decided not to book cabins for the extra cost of €140, booking ‘sleeper seats’ as we had on the Shetland Islands crossing. The hope was that the vessel would not be too crowded and that we could occupy some couches in the public areas to engage in horizontal, rather than ‘airline’ slumber.

The ship was manned by Greek men, none of whom had a body shape anything like those which their ancestors had captured in stone and now graced the world’s museums. All the cabin staff were dressed in uniform with candy pink striped vests and bow ties. None of them did a scrap of work, preferring to chat amongst themselves rather than help a customer. Those in the cafeteria were dismissive and disdainful and just ignored anyone who sought anything that was not immediately available, e.g. cutlery! The cafeteria opened half an hour later than advertised and shut dead on time, those arriving one minute late denied entry. Despite all of this we had an OK meal, the sea remained calm and the masses that seemed to be on board retired to the sanctuary of their cabins so that Peggy-Ann could stretch out nicely on a comfortable couch with her eyes patches in place.

Within the ‘sleeper seat’ area the Africans rolled out their sleeping mats, the guitarist constructed a little abode on the floor and changed into his pyjamas and I lifted three arm rests to turn 4 vacant seats into a comfortable bed.

The morning haze revealed the western coast of Greece with its grey barren hills and by 12.30 pm we were standing in the heat of the day at the Baras dock waiting for the connecting ‘Superfast’ coach to Athens. No one knew where the bus was, when it would come or where we should wait. This service for which tickets can only be bought on board and after 10 am for some reason that no one could explain, is supposed to be waiting for the arrival of the ferry. No one seems to care that there is no shade and no information but the coach does eventually arrive and we head off.

Two hours later we make a stop. It takes me a little while for the image to penetrate my comatosed brain but then I suddenly realise that we are at Piraeus, the port for Athens. On yet another trip in the past we had set sail (figuratively speaking as there was no wind) from here with two mates and a mad skipper named Garth, for a frolic around some idyllic Greek Islands, I made a hasty exit and into the adjacent ticket office. Within minutes Peggy-Ann and I were off the bus and sitting in the local taverna with passage to the island of Rhodes, just off the south west coast of Turkey, in hand.

We were leaving at 7 pm. We would arrive at about 9 am the following day. This time we booked a cabin – the price was right.

The morning haze revealed the western coast of Greece with its grey barren hills and by 12.30 pm we were standing in the heat of the day at the Baras dock waiting for the connecting ‘Superfast’ coach to Athens. No one knew where the bus was, when it would come or where we should wait. This service for which tickets can only be bought on board and after 10 am for some reason that no one could explain, is supposed to be waiting for the arrival of the ferry. No one seems to care that there is no shade and no information but the coach does eventually arrive and we head off.

Two hours later we make a stop. It takes me a little while for the image to penetrate my comatosed brain but then I suddenly realise that we are at Pyreus, the port for Athens. On yet another trip in the past we had set sail (figuratively speaking as there was no wind) from here with two mates and a mad skipper named Garth, for a frolic around some idyllic Greek Islands, I made a hasty exit and into the adjacent ticket office. Within minutes Peggy-Ann and I were off the bus and sitting in the local taverna with passage to the island of Rhodes, just off the south west coast of Turkey, in hand.

We were leaving at 7 pm. We would arrive at about 9 am the following day. This time we booked a cabin – the price was right.



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