Our West Coast Adventures during 2013 travel blog

Ecola State Park

Ecola State Park

Ecola State Park

Ecola State Park

Ecola State Park

Ecola State Park

Ecola State Park

Ecola State Park

Ecola State Park

Ecola State Park - lighthouse

Ecola State Park

Ecola State Park

Ecola State Park

Ecola State Park

Ecola State Park

Ecola State Park

Ecola State Park

Ecola State Park - Indian Beach

Ecola State Park - Indian Beach

Ecola State Park - Indian Beach

Ecola State Park - Indian Beach

Ecola State Park - Indian Beach

Ecola State Park - Indian Beach

Ecola State Park - Indian Beach

Ecola State Park - Indian Beach

Ecola State Park - Indian Beach

Ecola State Park - Indian Beach

Ecola State Park - Indian Beach

Ecola State Park - Indian Beach

Ecola State Park - Indian Beach

Ecola State Park - Indian Beach

Ecola State Park - Indian Beach

Ecola State Park - Indian Beach

Ecola State Park - Indian Beach

Ecola State Park - Indian Beach

Ecola State Park - Indian Beach

Ecola State Park - Indian Beach

Ecola State Park - Indian Beach

Ecola State Park - Indian Beach

Cannon Beach

Cannon Beach

Cannon Beach

Cannon Beach

Cannon Beach

Cannon Beach

Cannon Beach

Cannon Beach

Cannon Beach

Cannon Beach

Cannon Beach

Cannon Beach

Cannon Beach

Cannon Beach

Cannon Beach

Cannon Beach

Cannon Beach

Cannon Beach

Cannon Beach - Haystack Rock

Cannon Beach - Haystack Rock

Cannon Beach - Haystack Rock

Cannon Beach - Haystack Rock

Cannon Beach - Haystack Rock

Cannon Beach - Haystack Rock

Cannon Beach - Houston Tired and laying down

Cannon Beach


We drove down to Cannon Beach and stopped at Ecola State Park it features several miles of hiking trails through old growth forest, and several beaches. Haystack Rock and the Needles are visible in from many sites in the park. Much of the 1985 film The Goonies was filmed there, and the final scenes of the 1991 film Point Break were filmed at Indian Beach in the park. There is a lighthouse offshore that is no longer active, in fact it is privately owned and is now a Mausoleum, once a year ashes are taken out in aluminum cans for internment . The views from the bluffs are amazing. We went down to Indian Beach, a local surfing spot, there a many tidal pools where we saw Sea Stars, Sea Cucumbers and other sea creatures.

Off shore of Cannon Beach is Haystack Rock, the second one on the Oregon Coast, there is a friendly war of words going on between Cannon Beach and Pacific City where the other Haystack is located. Each says its is tallest, it really is an optical illusion. The one in Cannon Beach is close to shore and you can walk to it at low tide and is 225 feet high, the other one is 337 feet high but further offshore.

The first recorded journey by a European to what is now Cannon Beach was made by William Clark, one of the leaders of the Lewis and Clark's Corps of Discovery's 1806 trek over difficult terrain to see a beached whale and collected it's blubber in early 1806. The expedition was wintering at Fort Clatsop, roughly 20 miles to the north near the mouth of the Columbia River. Clark and several of his companions, including Sacagawea, completed a three-day journey on January 10, 1806, to the site of the beached whale. They encountered a group of Native Americans from the Tillamook tribe who were boiling blubber for storage. Clark and his party met with them and successfully bartered for 300 pounds of blubber and some whale oil before returning to Fort Clatsop. In 1846, a cannon from the US Navy schooner Shark washed ashore just north of Arch Cape, a few miles south of the community. The schooner hit land while attempting to cross the Columbia Bar, also known as the "Graveyard of the Pacific." The cannon, rediscovered in 1898, eventually inspired a name change for the growing community. In 1922, Elk Creek was redubbed Cannon Beach (after the name of the beach that extends south of Ecola Creek for eight miles, ending at Arch Cape) at the insistence of the Post Office Department because the name was frequently confused with Eola. Elk Creek itself was renamed Ecola Creek to honor William Clark's original name. The cannon is now housed in the city's museum and a replica of it can be seen alongside U.S. Highway 101. Two more cannons, also believed to have been from the Shark, were discovered on Arch Cape over the weekend of February 16, 2008.

We walked to Haystack rock after eating at the Wayfarer Inn, near the entrance to Cannon Beach. The town proper is a very touristy area.

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