2013 USA Pacific Northwest travel blog

Three Rivers, CA - Sequoia RV Ranch - Site 7

Three Rivers, CA - Sequoia RV Ranch - Site 7, another view

East Porterville to Three Rivers, CA 0 - our route - 53...

East Porterville to Three Rivers, CA 1 - as we turn west...

East Porterville to Three Rivers, CA 2

East Porterville to Three Rivers, CA 3 - one of the many...

East Porterville to Three Rivers, CA 4 - we have seen several...

East Porterville to Three Rivers, CA 5 - I believe we are...

East Porterville to Three Rivers, CA 6

East Porterville to Three Rivers, CA 7 - Lake Kaweah just a...

East Porterville to Three Rivers, CA 8

Sequoia NP 1 - a view of the Sierra Nevada's

Sequoia NP 2 - Morro Rock and the climb up it -...

Sequoia NP 3 - a large stand of sequoias - the car...

Sequoia NP 4 - tunnel tree and Libby

Sequoia NP 5 - tunnel rock on the way up

Sequoia NP 6 - lots of construction on the way up

Sequoia NP 7

Sequoia NP 8

Sequoia NP 9 - a dogwood just now blooming at this altitude

Sequoia NP 10 - Auto Log

Sequoia NP 11

Sequoia NP 12 - Sentinal Tree, just outside the museum - 28...

Sequoia NP 13 - more construction

Sequoia NP 14 - General Sherman - the largest tree on earth

Sequoia NP 15

Sequoia NP 16

Sequoia NP 17

Sequoia NP 18 - on the two-mile Congress Trail - many trees...

Sequoia NP 19 - this black bear was clawing for grubs as...

Sequoia NP 20 - then started walking away

Sequoia NP 21

Sequoia NP 22 - crossed in front of us like we were...

Sequoia NP 23 - another large grove of sequoias

Sequoia NP 24 - these are huge trees!

Sequoia NP 25 - the President

Sequoia NP 26 - Chief Seqouyah

Sequoia NP 27 - very few of these trees have not been...

Sequoia NP 28 - the Senate Group

Sequoia NP 29 - the root system is very pretty, though shallow...

Sequoia NP 30 - even at 5 ft 2 inches now, she...

Sequoia NP 31- Libby awaits and boy are we ready for her!!

Sequoia NP 32 - looks like a brown (grizzly) bear but it's...

Sequoia NP 33

Sequoia NP 34

Sequoia NP 35 - a viewpoint of King's Canyon - mighty pretty...

Sequoia NP 37 - going across some slick rock on the way...

Sequoia NP 38

Kings Canyon NP 1 - Centennial Stump

Kings Canyon NP 2

Kings Canyon NP 3 - the Gamlin Cabin

Kings Canyon NP 4

Kings Canyon NP 5 - inside the Gamlin Cabin, a huge, bare,...

Kings Canyon NP 6 - the General Grant Tree from a distance

Kings Canyon NP 7

Kings Canyon NP 8 - the bottom of the General Grant Tree...

Kings Canyon NP 9 - looking up to the top of the...

Kings Canyon NP 10 - the fire damaged side of the General...

Kings Canyon NP 11

Kings Canyon NP 12 - it is also called the Nation's Christmas...

Kings Canyon NP 13 - the small tree just to the right...

Kings Canyon NP 14 - can you find Libby waiting for us...

Kings Canyon NP 15 - starting to head down the mountain to...

Kings Canyon NP 16

Kings Canyon NP 17

Kings Canyon NP 18 - we'll be down on that road in...

Kings Canyon NP 19

Kings Canyon NP 20 - round and round we go - Doris...

Kings Canyon NP 21

Kings Canyon NP 22

Kings Canyon NP 23 - the Kings River running through the valley

Kings Canyon NP 24

Kings Canyon NP 25

Kings Canyon NP 26 - Grizzly Falls

Kings Canyon NP 27 - Roaring River Falls

Kings Canyon NP 28 - looking up at the sides of the...

Kings Canyon NP 29

Kings Canyon NP 30 - heading back up

Kings Canyon NP 31

Kings Canyon NP 32

Kings Canyon NP 33 - the large sequoia across the street from...

Movie Clips - Playback Requirements - Problems?

(MP4 - 3.40 MB)

General Grant Tree


Our trip from East Porterville to Three Rivers, CA was a short 53 miles through the orange groves in the valley. With just a couple of exceptions most of our trips in the future will only be 100 miles or less which are much more enjoyable than the longer ones like the previous one from Joshua Tree.

We are staying at the Sequoia RV Ranch about three miles north of Three Rivers. It's probably the best park in Three Rivers but our site is a little small. They have nicer ones on the river or just off the river but they are completely shaded and I MUST HAVE MY SATELLITE TV so we reserved one a little more in the open. After all, the softball playoffs are currently being played and our Gators are playing! We have absolutely zero Verizon service but the campground does have pretty good WiFi. We also have a 50 amps and water with a dump available.

Monday we spent the day inside Sequoia National Park. It is home to some of the most magnificent trees in the world - the Monarch Sequoias, also called the giant sequoias. There is a lot of construction going on until Memorial Day and it causes considerable delays in traveling the park. It didn't really detract from our experience much but did cause us to be late getting back to the Mothership, about 7:00 p.m. We saw all the big trees and walked the Congress Trail which is a two-mile trail going by several of the named trees and groves. We did get to see a couple of black bears, very close, feeding on grubs. It was a constant up and down and we were ready for it to be over by the time it was. Doris did really well and her legs were hurting and tired but her back was good!!

Tuesday we stayed in and recuperated, getting ready for our trip into Kings Canyon National Park on Wednesday.

Wednesday we toured Kings Canyon National Park which is really two parks in one: the newer Kings Canyon NP was created in 1940 to include the huge Sierra Nevada wilderness area around Kings Canyon and also incorporated the older General Grant NP (created in 1890 at the same time Sequoia NP was created) which included the Grant Grove of giant sequoia trees. Both the Kings Canyon and Sequoia National Parks are contained within the huge Sequoia National Forest, so you are constantly going between National Forest land and National Park land. This may not seem important but two different sets of rules are enforced since these two belong to two different cabinet departments. The Department of the Interior oversees our National Parks and the Department of Agriculture oversees our National Forests - they have different goals and consequently different rules. For instance the National Park Service prohibits any use of fallen wood as firewood, or even the picking up of a pine cone as everything needs to be left as if no humans were ever there. The National Forest Service on the other hand will let you use fallen wood for firewood and even issues permits for the cutting of trees to maintain the forest as a renewable resource.

We had a great time in Kings Canyon touring the Grant Grove with its General Grant Tree, which is now considered the second largest tree in the world since the Washington tree was reduced by about half its size due to fire and snow weight last decade. I have tried to take pictures of these big trees but it's impossible to portray their immense size. I did take a movie of the Grant Tree from the bottom up but it's still difficult to see just how big they are. Even seeing them live, the huge pines surrounding them make the sequoias seem smaller than they really are.

We then headed across the National Forest and down the mountains into Kings Canyon NP down into the glacier-carved valley. It's a spectacular ride descending over 3,000 feet, hugging the side of the mountains, with frequent turnouts to enhance the view. At the bottom, the geography is much like Yosemite, though smaller and with less features.

Tomorrow we head for Madera, CA for a one-night stay before going to Groveland, CA for a one-week stay just outside Yosemite National Park. We will have one day of phone service before hiding out for another week!

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