ADVENTURES IN OUR AMERICAN DREAM travel blog

We passed by this awesome resort on the drive today...

We saw a lot of wowser homes too...

View..

Loved this blue home in Gills Rock..

A cool lighthouse Inn...

This resort is at the very end of Door County, as far...

You can take a boat to Washington Island too, we are still...

Info..

A cool shop ...

The ferry...you can even take your RV on this one..

The Visitor Center in Gills Rock...

We saw a lot of cherry trees on the drive today...

We bought a lot of cherry items too, the cherry jam is...

Last one!


We have been busy as beavers trying to see all we can in one week. We finally found a spot for another week today. Yippee! It took a lot of searching, we totally forgot about it being Labor Day weekend coming up. Almost all the campgrounds were booked for the week. We do have to move to a different campground. We both feel it is worth moving to be able to stay an extra week.

We drove to the end of the peninsula today all the way to Gills Rock. This is where you board the ferry to go to Washington Island near the peninsula, we are planning the trip for one day next week. You can take your car on the ferry or walk on and take a tour when you arrive. We are also checking into taking a boat across, stay tuned to see how we end up going. It should be fun day either way. I am adding photos taken on our drive today, we still have not had time to visit any of the lighthouses on the peninsula but will soon. I am pasting a bit of information about Gills Rock for anyone wanting to know more. Check back later for more from Door Peninsula.

Gills Rock was originally known as "Hedgehog Harbor," the name given it by Washington Island fisherman and boat builder Amos Lovejoy. In 1855, Lovejoy decided to winter his sloop on the shores of a cove he liked to fish. Over that winter, a family of hedgehogs, also known as porcupines, moved on board. When Lovejoy launched his sloop again in spring, he didn't notice the numerous holes the hedgehogs had chewed in the hull. The boat began taking on water through those holes and Lovejoy was forced to abandon the sloop and come ashore. The cove was renamed Gills Rock in 1870 in honor of Elias Gill, a prominent lumberer. Gills Rock remains a popular photo opportunity for visitors who can’t resist the fish houses and commercial fishing tugs that line the waterfront.

Share |