DAVE & REBECCA'S BIG ADVENTURE travel blog

about the powder river.

hwy 12, we pulled over for lunch

on a ranchers access road

we like eating out like this... fresh air, great scenery, lots o...

our stop for two nights.

we recommend it...

our setup, nice shade tree, grass and a newspaper in the morning...

We "finally" put on North Dakota...

park entrance

beautiful valley, that's the Little Bighorn River in the trees.

lots o horses in the area...

hope you can make out the writing of the Reno-Benteen battlefield, 6...

Indian memorial

 

don't walk off the trail...

even the Army horses get memorialized, they're very important to the cavalry.

horse cemetary

Soldier Memorial

 

Eric von Schmidt's painting, "Here fell Custer," accurate portrayal.

"Last stand hill"

visitors center with Last Stand Hill in the background...

marker where Custer fell. his body has been moved to be reinterred...

Last Stand Hill with Little Bighorn River in the background...

 

 


The beautiful 260 mile drive from Bowman to Billings didn't seem long for all the scenery kept us busy "wowing" and "ooooogaling" at it. We did stop for lunch along the road but other than that we kept going. We arrived at The Trailer Village RV park about 3:30 p.m. It is a nice park with wide roads and nice grassy spaces. The next morning we headed over (about 60 miles) to the Little Bighorn Battlefield. We found the area of the battlefield to be rolling grassland cacading down to the lovely Little Bighorn River. What horrors men on both sides of the battles experienced in such a wonderfully tranquil place. Studying about this place we found many things didn't fit to our early schooling. This was a clash of two cultures AND a military debacle set in motion by Lt. Col. Custer. Little Bighorn battlefield memorializes a major battle fought on June 25th 1876, between Lakota, cheyenne and Arapaho Indians, against the United States Army. these tribes were fighting to preserve their traditional way of life as nomadic buffalo hunters. The U.S. army was carrying out the Grant Adminitration instructions to remove the Lakota Sioux and Cheyenne peoples to the great Sioux Reservation in Dakota Territory. In December 1991 there was a name change of this park from "Custer Battlefield National Monument" to "Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument". As a major step in the move to be more inclusive of Native American participation in the battle. First off, it wasn't a "massacre", of the more than 600 soldiers 265 died. Also, how could it be a massacre by definition when Lt.Col. Custer initiated the attack. Across the battlefield ranging 5 miles there are white markers for the soldiers and red granite markers denoting where indians had fallen.

We enjoyed our day here, we took in as much of the information as our minds could handle on a hot day in July! We drove the distance of 6 miles to far end of the battle area to learn more.

We will not try to explain the battle or the policies here, for that you'll have to come here yourself OR go to www.nps.gov/libi

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