My Odyssey with Daisy 2016 travel blog


This afternoon I had the full-body bone scan ordered by Dr. Harper. Austin Radiological Association (ARA) called this morning to tell me that Humana had approved the scan and that they had an opening this afternoon. That was great news!

First, I went in to have an injection of a tracer. Then I had to wait for a couple of hours before the scan could be performed. During that interim period I had to drink lots of liquid. I went to a nearby Chinese restaurant for lunch; I drank two tall glasses of tea and also took some with me.

I still had some time to kill so I went to Savers to look around, thinking that I might find a good used book. I didn’t find a book that I wanted but did find a tiny cross-body bag that is exactly the right size for my compact camera. The price was right, too, with a 30% discount.

Back at ARA, I expected to have to put on one of those “high-fashion” gowns but didn’t even have to take off my shoes. All I had to remove was my jewelry. The scan took about thirty minutes and covered front and back of my body from head to toe. It will be available to Dr. Harper tomorrow morning. I certainly hope it will give him enough information to know for sure how to proceed.

According to WebMD.com, a bone scan is a test that can find damage to the bones, find cancer that has spread to the bones, and watch problems such as infection and trauma to the bones. A bone scan can often find a problem days to months earlier than a regular X-ray test. During a bone scan, a radioactive substance called a tracer is injected into a vein in your arm. The tracer travels through your bloodstream and into your bones. Then a special camera takes pictures of the tracer in your bones. Areas that absorb little or no amount of tracer appear as dark or "cold" spots. This could show a lack of blood supply to the bone or certain types of cancer. Areas of fast bone growth or repair absorb more tracer and show up as bright or "hot" spots in the pictures. Hot spots may point to problems such as arthritis, a tumor, a fracture, or an infection. [http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/bone-scan#1]

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