Larry & Lee Ann's Journey travel blog

Kids over 106 FREE with ID, LOL!....

Lynne is keeping her distance while feeding...

Are you having a discussion honey? They're sure listening intently!

Check out that neck!

A face only a mother could love!

Moving on to Donkeytown...

A little info for you...

These guys were very gentle...

He does look like the little Shrek donkey, too cute!

I like the little doe deers....

Let's check out the Hole In The Wall Gang...

A little info on these different goats...

They were anxious to see me!

A bit odd looking aren't they!

Let's check out the Lorikeets...

Pretty bright colors...

Patiently waiting for their turn...

Are you looking at me?

Time for a bath...

Ouch, does that hurt honey?

Interesting egg info...

Ready for purchase in a cooler with a clearly marked puncture spot...

Empties available for purchase...

A few of the ones for sale with some neat decorating ideas...

Hope you enjoyed the tour, oh, that's Picacho Peak in the background...


We arrived in Casa Grande late Tuesday afternoon after an uneventful 150 mile or so drive. It was the first time pulling the 5'er since we had the brakes repaired and we were thrilled that they are finally working correctly. I don't know if I mentioned that the problem was the wiring inside the axles or not. We are amazed at the small size wiring used by Dexter axle but I suppose most folks will never experience an issue with it. It's been a real problem for us and took almost 2 years to identify. Anyway, no more brake disconnect/brake failure bells and lights for us, yippeee!

We had a wonderful time at the Dead Horse State park but I am so glad to have full hook-ups again! After setting up, and freshening up, we met friends Gary & Lynne for a wonderful Mexican dinner. We spent a couple of hours catching up and agreed to meet in the morning for a short trip to the Rooster Cogburn Ostrich Ranch in Picacho.

Sitting on 600 acres between Phoenix and Tucson on Interstate 10 is the largest privately owned Ostrich ranch in the U.S.A. The ranch raises its own birds, they do not board for other people but they do share their experience and joy of these magnificent birds with those that want to stop by and see them. The ranch is the home to over 1100 Pure South African Black hens laying.

For a $5 entrance fee we got a container of food to feed the Ostrich, Fallow Deer, Sicilian Miniature Donkeys, Boer Goats and a cup of nectar for the Rainbow Lorikeets. I'm not sure which I enjoyed most. They were all unique in their own way. All deer are adorable and the Sicilian miniature donkey's were very sweet. The Boer goats have such comical looking faces and really weird looking eyes. And the Lorikeets were so pretty! They made me a bit nervous when 5-6 jumped on me at once. Eventually I relaxed after realizing that I wasn't in a recreation of Alfred Hitchcock's movie 'The Birds'! They were my favorite.

Moving on to the ostrich, we learned that the Ostrich is the largest living bird in the world. It is native to Africa and is a desert animal. The adult males are called roosters (just like chickens) and are 8 to 9 feet tall weighing in at 350 to 400 lbs. The hens are a little smaller but during breeding season they will get to 300 to 350 lbs. They don’t fly but can run at speeds of up to 40 mph! The birds live to be 50 to 70 years old.

An Ostrich egg is equivalent in volume to 2 dozen chicken eggs. The hen can lay 40 - 100 eggs per year (that’s like 960 chicken eggs at the smallest number of 40!) An Ostrich egg tastes very similar to the chicken egg but are fluffier and are great for baking and pastries but if you are planning to have them soft boiled for breakfast know that it will take an hour, and if you want hard boiled, plan on one and a half hours! The meat from the Ostrich is a red meet that looks and tastes much like beef (seriously) and has a lower fat and cholesterol level than either turkey or chicken.

The old story of the Ostrich burying it’s head in the sand is a fable. The male will dig a deep hole in the sand to build a nest for the eggs and that is probably what has been seen, which is why people thought they were burying their head in the sand. It’s for the protection of the eggs that they dig such a big hole (up to 6-8 feet wide and 2-3 feet deep). They also bite, as posted in several places. Trust me, I didn't get close enough to find out! But my honey had no problem letting them eat right out of his hand.

We really enjoyed our outing and recommend you make this a stop while in this area. You won't be disappointed!



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