Our West Coast Adventures during 2013 travel blog

Our second cactus bloom

Saltair Pavilion

Saltair Pavilion

Saltair Pavilion

Saltair Pavilion

Saltair Pavilion

Saltair Pavilion

Saltair Pavilion

Boneville Salt Flats

Boneville Salt Flats

Boneville Salt Flats

Boneville Salt Flats

Boneville Salt Flats

Boneville Salt Flats

Boneville Salt Flats

Boneville Salt Flats

Boneville Salt Flats

Boneville Salt Flats

Boneville Salt Flats

Boneville Salt Flats

Boneville Salt Flats

Boneville Salt Flats

Boneville Salt Flats

Boneville Salt Flats

Boneville Salt Flats

Boneville Salt Flats

Boneville Salt Flats

Boneville Salt Flats


On our journey to Grass Valley, we stopped and dry camped at a rest area on the Bonneville Salt Flats. We stopped at Saltair on the Great Salt Lake on the way, it use to be a wooden resort for swimming in the Great Salt Lake, it has burnt down several times and is now a music concert venue.

SaltAir Pavilion - The first Saltair, completed in 1893. Saltair was not the first resort built on the shores of the Great Salt Lake, but was the most successful ever built. It was designed by well-known Utah architect Richard K.A. Kletting and rested on over 2,000 posts and pilings. The first Saltair pavilion and a few other buildings were destroyed by fire on April 22, 1925. A new pavilion was built and the resort was expanded at the same location. It did not fare well, it went bankrupt and then because of its proximity to Interstate Highway 80, plus new population expansion into the Tooele Valley and the western Salt Lake Valley, prompted the construction of a new Saltair in 1981. The new pavilion was constructed out of a salvaged Air Force aircraft hangar and is used for music concerts

The Bonneville Salt Flats is a densely-packed salt pan in Tooele County in northwestern Utah. The area is a remnant of the Pleistocene Lake Bonneville and is the largest of many salt flats located west of the Great Salt Lake. Despite being wrongly associated with drag racing, setting speed records at the Bonneville Salt Flats is racing of a unique sort —no "0-60" records are broken here. Since the salt is somewhat slick, maintaining traction is a major concern of every racer. Cars start slower than many expect, but they make their way up to some very fast speeds. Given the great size of the flats, there is plenty of room for these race cars to reach their full potential. There are two to three tracks, depending on the condition of the salt, set up for each event. The shortest is usually a 5-mile course while the long-course usually runs 7 miles. Breedlove broke the 400, 500 and 600 mph land speed records and hel the record of 600.601 from November 1965 until October 1970 when Gary Gabelich obtained a speed of 622.407.



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