A&E on the World Heritage Train East 2009 travel blog

Magome

Magome

Magome

Magome

Nakasendo farmer (An Erica pic)

Bamboo forests along the Nakasendo

Along the Nakasendo

Rice stalks drying in the rain

Tsumago (by phone!)

Tsumago

Tsumago

Towards Nagiso

Water wood bamboo

Nagiso


In the Edo period (17th to early 19th century) most travel was on foot, and two famous routes were the Tokaido and the Nakasendo. The Nakasendo went through the Kiso Valley south of here, about 40 miles of narrow steep-sided valley amongst forested mountains, all very attractive. Three of the villages in the valley are preserved sort of like they were in Edo times, very attractive they are too, and not surprisingly, with many fine shopping and photo opportunities.

It took a train and a bus to get to Magome, and then we walked on the old Nakasendo road - now a pedestrian path - first to Tsumago, and then when we realised we would have to wait a long time for a bus, on to Nagiso. Actually we were glad for the extra 4 kms (after the inital 7) as this was a particularly nice stretch. The Nakasendo was all really nice walking, through very lovely countryside and forests, past lovely old houses, etc. Sadly, it rained all day again. This wouldn`t have been so bad, but by the time we got to the most picturesque bit at Tsumago, both our cameras had misted up altogether, and I was reduced to using my phone to take pictures. Japan is tricky on the weather front, summer is way too hot and humid, winter too cold, spring and autumn are clearly the best, but these are when most Japanese tourists spring into action and when it rains most!



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