Larry & Lee Ann's Journey 2 travel blog

Arriving for our tour...Can't wait!

Larry, Kelvin & a couple of Kelvin's railroad buddies...

West end of the East Ely yar. Building on the left is...

A closer look for you...

Love this sign :)

First stop, the machine shop...

Meet our guide Kelvin :)

Time wall...No clock here!

Info for you...

Interesting....

Size perspective probably doesn't show well here but these are big!

Wear Your Glasses!

Working on #93...

Zach spent 30 minutes or more sharing with us, much appreciated!

We learned alot & Larry really loved it!

It's like time hasn't moved on in here!

Did I mention I am having a ball? Yep, I am!

Date on train....1909!

My hubby is in hog heaven!

Engineer Kelvin explaining dials & levers....

Everything in here is big!

This is a snow plow for the tracks....Wow!

This is the Repair In Place building, better known as the RIP...

Moving along as we tour the different types of cars...

The Post Office was very unique....

Letter box on the side...

A peek inside...

Nice stained glass windows...

Leather seats for coach seating...

Red velvet for First Class passengers...Pretty windows

Kelvin & Larry consider themselves first class! Love the windows & the...

Striker plate in smoking section...

Better view of lighting...

This concrete coaling tower was built in 1917...

Info sign...

Scale House...

Big plow!

Running behind us...

Got to meet both of them...Neat guys!

Chatting with Mark out front at end of our tour today...

One of several cool paintings in museum...

Plenty to see in this small but well done museum...

Hope you enjoyed the tour! We sure did :)


Today's post takes us back about a month ago, a couple of days before leaving Ely. Mom's next door neighbor & our good friend Kelvin offered to give us a behind-the-scenes- guided tour of the local train depot. Kelvin is a part time engineer, volunteering several days a month & working at the local mine the other days of the month. He was born & raised here in Ely & has grown up around the train depot. We could tell he takes great pride in being a member of this train 'family'. We spent almost 4 hours touring the complex, listening with delight to the many memories in Kelvin's mind. We were able to meet many of the other folks working behind the scenes including a couple of the blacksmith's, mechanic's, firemen, conductor's & other engineer's.

We learned that the Nevada Northern Railway Complex is the best-preserved, least altered, and most complete main yard complex remaining from the steam railroad era. It was established in 1905 to support the area's booming copper mining industry. The era of dieselization of the railroad industry during the second half of the 20th century led to alterations and demolitions of railroad yards and shops nationwide, but the East Ely yard escaped modernization because of its geographical remoteness and the decline of the mining industry it once served.

The Mission Revival style depot was designed by Frederick Hale and built in 1907. It was a significant location on the Nevada Northern as the chief embarkation point for the copper mining region of White Pine County. The location of the depot was a matter of controversy between the railroad and residents of Ely, who successfully sued the railroad to change the depot's name from Ely to East Ely to reflect its distance from the main townsite. The railroad, originally owned by the Nevada Consolidated Copper Company, was transferred to the Kennecott Copper Company in 1933 when it took over Consolidated's mining operations. Passenger service on the Nevada Northern stopped in 1941, and the depot was used for Kennecott offices until 1985. The state of Nevada acquired the depot in 1990 for the museum.

The museum collection includes three steam locomotives, an electric locomotive, and several diesel-electric locomotives, as well as a collection of maintenance equipment and numerous historic freight and passenger rail cars. The museum also maintains an extensive fleet of its original rolling stock, including passenger cars, wood-side box cars, ore cars, and work trains, all dating from the 1910's. It has the oldest operating tank car and the oldest operating coal-fired steam crane on any American railroad.

Since the 2016 Summer Olympics are being held in Rio right now I thought you might find it interesting to note that during the 2002 Winter Olympics, held in Salt Lake City, the railroad was part of the Olympic Steam Team, carrying spectators to the Soldier Hollow Olympic venue. The railroad's No. 93 steam-engine, joined Utah's Heber Valley Railroad's Nos. 618 and 75 steam-engines, in pulling eight-car trains full of passengers, to the Soldier Hollow depot where they disembarked and continued to the venue entrance on a horse-drawn sleigh. The day prior to the Opening Ceremony of the games, all three locomotives were combined into one triple-headed train, and used to transport the Olympic flame from Soldier Hollow to Heber City, Utah as part of the torch relay :)

It has also been featured many times on PBS, as well as The History Channel's television shows, "Modern Marvels" and "American Restorations." Various items from the station have been restored and featured on Rick Dale's ÔÇťAmerican Restorations."

This isn't simply a museum, but a working railroad with rides on the rails that used to carry both passengers and ore. Larry and I have ridden the train twice, once the steam locomotive and once the diesel locomotive. The staff were very knowledgeable and provided excellent narration. However, I have to admit that we enjoyed our 'private' tour with our engineer friend Kelvin way more! Thank you so much Kelvin, we loved it!!!!



Advertisement
OperationEyesight.com
Entry Rating:     Why ratings?
Please Rate:  
Thank you for voting!
Share |