2010 Tour of New England and the Maritimes travel blog

Riding the Truro Express

Maritime Museum of the Atlantic

Sue relaxing on the deck of the "Titanic"

Halifax Harbor in the fog

The stores were open

They found out about my unpaid Vancouver speeding ticket

Mussels for a snack

Halifax from Citadel Hill

Boondocks

Deep water drilling rig moored in the harbor


We went to Truro yesterday to see the Tidal Bore, a wave that rolls up the river as the tide comes in. What a bore. We got there about 15 minutes late and missed it. Nothing else to see in Truro except chain saw carving made from diseased elm tree logs that commemorate famous people from the town.

Today we went to Halifax. Should have gone yesterday as the weather was sunny and warm and today it’s raining and foggy. We went to the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic to keep out of the rain. The museum has a great collection of Titanic memorabilia. When the Titanic sunk, the recovery ships set sail from Halifax since it was the closest to the sinking and brought the recovered bodies and debris back to the port. Canada is also celebrating the 100th anniversary of the Canadian Navy and Halifax is the home base for the Atlantic fleet. Halifax played a crucial role in both WWI and WWII as a convoy rallying point for cargo ships carrying war supplies to England. Halifax is also the location of the world’s largest man-made accidental explosion in 1917 (Texas City disaster of 1947 is a close 2nd). A French ship carrying explosives collided with a Norwegian ship in the narrow channel of Halifax harbor. The French ship burned and exploded killing about 2,000 people, creating a 60 ft tidal wave, and leveled building over about 500 acres. There’s a web site dedicated to the event - www.halifaxexplosion.org.

After the museum, we walked along the waterfront, but not much was open. Not sure if it was the weather or Sunday. We had dinner at the Boondocks in Fisherman’s Cove outside of Halifax. It’s a step above the Boondocks in Delaware. No crabs, but lobster, mussels and Atlantic salmon.

Our next stop is Cape Breton National Park at the northern end of Nova Scotia.

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