ADVENTURES IN OUR AMERICAN DREAM travel blog

Loved the beautiful palms on the drive to the park..

Red Rock Canyon..

Wowser views...

Visitor Center..

We were hoping to see Mojave Max but he was in hibernation..:-)

Info...

Wowser view from inside the visitor center...

We drove the 13-mile scenic loop, it was outstanding..

Can you see the people at the bottom??

Zoomed view..

Views from the drive..

 

My beautiful sister, Betty..

Betty took this one of us...

Back on the scenic drive..

View..

A waterfall in the distance..

Zoomed view..

I would love to see one on the road...:-)

They have a lot of water in the park from so much...

Water flowing across the road...

Last one, don't miss this beautiful park while in Vegas.


This update covers our visit to the Red Rock Canyon National Conservative Area. We visited this park with family back in 2011 and loved it. We drove the 13-mile scenic drive again today and made a lot of stops for pictures. The Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area is an area managed by the Bureau of Land Management. It is located about 15 miles west of Las Vegas. The area is visited by more than two million people each year.

The conservation area showcases a set of large red rock formations: a set of sandstone peaks and walls called the Keystone Thrust. The walls are up to 3,000 feet high, making them a popular hiking and rock climbing destination. The highest point is La Madre Mountain, at 8,154 feet. A one-way loop road, 13 miles long, provides vehicle access to many of the features in the area. Several side roads and parking areas allow access to many of the area trails.

We stopped at the Visitor Center hoping to see Mojave Max. I totally forgot he would be hibernating this time of year. Who is Mojave Max? According to the information on the website, Mojave Max is a desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) that lives at Red Rock Canyon NCA. Max is a desert “spokestortoise” for all the wild tortoises that live in the Mojave Desert. :-) He resides at our Visitor Center, along with eight females and a large male tortoise named Hugo. The desert tortoise is Nevada’s state reptile, so Max serves as an important reminder to respect, protect and enjoy all the animals and plants of the Mojave Desert. Mojave Max programs are provided to local schools in partnership with Clark County’s Desert Conservation Program and the Clark County School District. Maybe we will get to me Max and his family next time. :-) Check back later for more from Nevada.

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